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Cerebellar haematomas caused by angiomas in children
  1. G. Erenberg2,
  2. R. Rubin,
  3. K. Shulman
  1. Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx Municipal Hospital Center, Bronx, N.Y., U.S.A.
  2. The Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery of the Department of Neurological Surgery, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx Municipal Hospital Center, Bronx, N.Y., U.S.A.
  3. The Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx Municipal Hospital Center, Bronx, N.Y., U.S.A.
  4. Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center, Bronx, N.Y., U.S.A.

    Abstract

    Spontaneous cerebellar haematomas in previously well children are most often caused by haemorrhage from small angiomas. Eight such cases in children 12 years of age or younger have been reported previously. Their clinical course was usually not as acute as the course most commonly seen in adults, and four of the children survived after evacuation of the haematoma. Two additional cases are presented. Both children were admitted in a comatose state, but survived after surgical intervention. Cerebellar haematomas in children seem to have a better prognosis than in adults and should be considered in the evaluation of children with subarachnoid haemorrhage or the rapid onset of coma. Even if admitted in extremis, recovery is possible after prompt diagnosis and surgical evacuation of the haematoma.

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    Footnotes

    • 2 Reprint requests: Gerald Erenberg, Pediatric Neurology, Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center, 111 E. 210 St., Bronx, New York 10467, U.S.A.

    • 1 This work was supported in part by a Special Traineeship Award, number 2F11NB01965, from the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke.

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