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J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 67:169-173 doi:10.1136/jnnp.67.2.169
  • Paper

When the left brain is not right the right brain may be left: report of personal experience of occipital hemianopia

  1. Monroe Cole
  1. Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106–5000, USA
  1. Dr Monroe Cole, Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106–5000, USA. Telephone 001 216 844 3769; fax 001 216 844 5066.
  • Received 16 October 1998
  • Revised 5 March 1999
  • Accepted 5 March 1999

Abstract

OBJECTIVES To make a personal report of a hemianopia due to an occipital infarct, sustained by a professor of neurology.

METHODS Verbatim observation of neurological phenomena recorded during the acute illness.

RESULTS Hemianopia, visual hallucinations, and non-occipital deficits without extraoccipital lesions on MRI, are described and discussed.

CONCLUSIONS Hemianopia, due to an occipital infarct, without alexia, is not a disability which precludes a normal professional career. Neurorehabilitation has not been necessary.

Footnotes