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Continuous drop type of orthostatic hypotension
  1. TAKANORI YOKOTA,
  2. KAZUTO MITANI,
  3. YUKINOBU SAITO
  1. Department of Neurology
  2. Third Department of Internal Medicine,Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113, Japan
  3. Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital,Tokyo 183, Japan
  1. Dr Takanori Yokota, Department of Neurology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan. Telephone +81-3-5803-5234; fax +81-3-5808-0169.
  1. TOSHIYUKI ONIKI
  1. Department of Neurology
  2. Third Department of Internal Medicine,Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113, Japan
  3. Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital,Tokyo 183, Japan
  1. Dr Takanori Yokota, Department of Neurology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan. Telephone +81-3-5803-5234; fax +81-3-5808-0169.
  1. MICHIYUKI HAYASHI
  1. Department of Neurology
  2. Third Department of Internal Medicine,Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113, Japan
  3. Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital,Tokyo 183, Japan
  1. Dr Takanori Yokota, Department of Neurology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan. Telephone +81-3-5803-5234; fax +81-3-5808-0169.

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Orthostatic hypotension has usually been evaluated for 2–10 minutes after standing.1 2 Multiple system atrophy (MSA: Shy-Drager syndrome) is one of the neurodegeneratative diseases which show marked orthostatic hypotension. We studied changes of blood pressure for more than 20 minutes after standing in 30 patients with MSA.

The patients lay down on a tilting table, and an intravenous cannula was introduced into the cubital vein more than 30 minutes before the 25 minute test of 60° head up tilt. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded every minute with an automatic sphygmomanometer. Patients could clearly be classified into two groups in terms of the time taken to reach the minimum blood pressure. In 12 patients systolic blood pressure fell rapidly, reached a minimum within 5 minutes, and then remained stable or partially recovered (early drop type); whereas, in 13 patients blood pressure fell immediately after tilting but kept decreasing by more than 8 mm Hg from that at 5 minutes (mean 12.8 mm Hg; maximum 74 mm Hg), taking more than 10 minutes to reach the minimum (continuous drop type) (figure). The other five patients could not remain standing for more than 5 minutes because of symptoms of orthostatic hypotension. No patient showed the sudden drop in blood pressure and heart rate seen in vasovagal syncope. In the continuous drop type, there were no decreases between 5 and 20 minutes in heart rate (+2.3 bpm) and the noradrenaline (norepinephrine) level (+0.05 ng/ml) during the decrease in blood pressure. A slight increase in packed cell volume between 5 and 20 minutes was noted (mean=1.4%).

Most patients with continuous drop type orthostatic hypotension reported reduced endurance for more than 10 minutes of exercise (easy fatiguability). Two experienced syncope more than 20 minutes after standing.

We used a Swan-Ganz catheter to investigate the haemodynamics in three patients with orthostatic hypotension of the continuous drop type. To prevent the concentration of plasma, saline of calculated volume was infused during tilting. During the continuous decease in blood pressure, cardiac output proportionally decreased but systemic vascular resistance did not change (figure).

Continuous drop type of orthostatic hypotension during 25 minute tilt up in a patient with MSA. SBP=systolic blood pressure; HR=heart rate; CO=cardiac output; SVR=systemic vascular resistance; NA=plasma noradrenaline concentration.

Our results suggest that in many patients with MSA the blood pressure drops continuously on standing. The continuous blood pressure drop is caused by continuous reduction of cardiac output. A part of the mechanism for continuous reduction of cardiac output should be lack of reflex tachycardia and no significant release of noradrenaline which are caused by interruption of the baroreflex arc, as is known in MSA.3 However, further explanation, such as continuous vasodilatation of the volume vessels, is necessary for the difference in mechanisms between the early drop type and the continuous drop type. As we did not record heart rate and blood pressure continuously and did not evaluate ventricular function by echocardiography, the final conclusion and its interpretation require further study.

We think that more than a 20 minute tilt up study is needed to evaluate orthostatic hypotension and that reduced endurance of exercise and the syncope that occurs some time after standing should be considered symptoms of a continuous drop in blood pressure.

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