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Procainamide for faecal incontinence in myotonic dystrophy
  1. G PELLICCIONI,
  2. O SCARPINO
  1. Department of Neurology, INRCA, Geriatric Hospital, Ancona, Italy
  2. Department of Radiology, Az. N 7, Ancona, Italy
  1. Dr Giuseppe Pelliccioni, Department of Neurology, Geriatric Hospital, via della Montagnola, 164, 60100 Ancona, Italy. Telephone 0039 071 8003432; fax 0039 071 8003530; email: o.scarpino{at}fastnet.it
  1. V PILONI
  1. Department of Neurology, INRCA, Geriatric Hospital, Ancona, Italy
  2. Department of Radiology, Az. N 7, Ancona, Italy
  1. Dr Giuseppe Pelliccioni, Department of Neurology, Geriatric Hospital, via della Montagnola, 164, 60100 Ancona, Italy. Telephone 0039 071 8003432; fax 0039 071 8003530; email: o.scarpino{at}fastnet.it

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We read with interest the article by Abercrombieet al which describes the pathophysiology and surgical management of faecal incontinence in two siblings with severe myotonic dystrophy.1

In the authors’ experience, long term results of both medical and surgical management of the faecal incontinence were unsatisfactory, as proved by the fact that postanal sphincter repair restored faecal continence only for a brief time.

The authors’ pessimistic conclusions suggest that “faecal incontinence in myotonic dystrophy is difficult to relieve by any currently available treatment other than colostomy”. It should be noted, however, that the medical treatment used is not specified in the text.

Our experience with medical treatment using procainamide in a patient with severe myotonic dystrophy and faecal incontinence is less disappointing.2 The patient—a 19 year old man—had had his illness diagnosed 4 years earlier on clinical grounds and electrophysiological and genetic tests. Early symptoms of sphincteric impairment developed soon after, including mild stress urinary incontinence and minor episodes of poor control of loose stool.

A complete diagnostic investigation, including physical examination, defecography, and electrophysiogical tests of pelvic floor musculature, was performed. At physical examination, digital anorectal evaluation showed low squeeze pressures. A reduced rectal diameter (4.5 cm), anal gaping, and barium loss at rest were found at defecography. Motor evoked potentials elicited by cortical and lumbar magnetic stimulation and recorded from the external anal sphincter3 showed a normal latency and decreased amplitude. Somatosensory evoked potentials after anal stimulation and sacral reflex latency were normal. EMG recording of the external anal sphincter showed, as in the first patient of Abercrombie et al, a decreased number of motor units and multiple myotonic discharges. Few motor unit potentials presented polyphasic waveforms and decreased duration and amplitude.

A regular treatment with procainamide (300 mg twice a day) lead to a dramatic improvement of both systemic myotonia and faecal incontinence. A 13 month follow up assessment has shown a stable clinical improvement. Repeated electrophysiological investigation showed disappearance of myotonic discharges at the external anal sphincter, whereas defecography disclosed an improved rectal compliance (5.2 cm in diameter) at capacity and no more than a barium leak on straining.

The pathophysiology of motor disorders of the gastrointestinal tract in myotonic dystrophy is still debated and controversial. Histological study of the external anal sphincter and the EMG pattern in patients with myotonic dystrophy show a multitude of defects including expression of myotonia, myopathy, muscular atrophy, and neural abnormalities.1 4

The possible management of myotonia and some of its clinical manifestations, such as dyspnoea,5 by antimyotonic drugs (disopyramide and procainamide), justifies the use of the same pharmacological approach in anal sphincteric dysfunction manifested in a few cases of myotonic dystrophy.

We conclude that treatment of faecal incontinence with procainamide should always be attempted before any surgical option in patients with myotonic dystrophy.

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