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Cervical syringomyelia at the C7-C8 level presenting with bilateral scapular winging
  1. N NIEDERMAIER
  1. Department of Neurology, Klinikum Ludwigshafen
  2. Department of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Germany
  3. Department of Neuroradiology
  1. Dr N Niedermaier, Department of Neurology, Klinikum Ludwigshafen, Bremserstrasse 79, 67063 Ludwigshafen, Germany
  1. H-M MEINCK
  1. Department of Neurology, Klinikum Ludwigshafen
  2. Department of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Germany
  3. Department of Neuroradiology
  1. Dr N Niedermaier, Department of Neurology, Klinikum Ludwigshafen, Bremserstrasse 79, 67063 Ludwigshafen, Germany
  1. M HARTMANN
  1. Department of Neurology, Klinikum Ludwigshafen
  2. Department of Neurology, University of Heidelberg, Germany
  3. Department of Neuroradiology
  1. Dr N Niedermaier, Department of Neurology, Klinikum Ludwigshafen, Bremserstrasse 79, 67063 Ludwigshafen, Germany

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Scapular winging is a neurological sign specifically caused by weakness of the serratus anterior, trapezius, or rhomboid muscles.1 2 Trauma, complications of surgery, myopathies, or peripheral nerve diseases are the major causes. We report on a patient with bilateral scapular winging as the presenting symptom of cervical syringomyelia at the C7-C8 spinal cord segments.

This 38 year old carpenter complained of progressive involuntary movements of the right arm associated with arm and shoulder pain for the past 3 years. Involuntary movements were provoked by writing and similar activities. The patient was suspected of having a psychogenic movement disorder.

Examination disclosed normal cranial nerve functions, mild hypertrophy of the right arm muscles, bilateral scapular winging of the serratus anterior type, and mild paresis of the left and right serratus anterior and triceps muscles. The left triceps tendon jerk was attenuated, but the remaining deep tendon reflexes of the arms were normal. The knee and ankle jerks were brisk and symmetric. Examination of sensation, including thermesthesia, was normal.

Skilled manual activities involving the right hand such as picking up a pen or holding a cup of coffee stereotypically induced brisk adduction of the right arm combined with pronation of the hand. Rhythmic alternating movements of the normal left hand were regularly interrupted when action dystonia of the right hand began; indeed this suggested psychogenic dystonia.

Electromyographic examinations showed chronic neurogenic changes of both serratus anterior and triceps muscles. Nerve conduction and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies were normal. Median and ulnar nerve somatosensory evoked potentials showed significant attenuation on the left. Laboratory tests and cranial MRI were normal. Cervical MRI showed a small central cord lesion at the level of vertebral body C7, probably cervical syringomyelia (figure), as well as a hindbrain hernia. The patient was followed up for 2 years, and his condition remained stable.

Sagittal T1 weighted image (SE 500/25 ms) disclosing a small intramedullary cervical syrinx at the level of the vertebral body C7/T1.

It is generally thought that three spinal roots, C5, C6, and C7, contribute to the long thoracic nerve which supplies the serratus anterior muscle.1 3 Isolated root lesions of C7-Th1 are not a generally accepted reason for prominent weakness of the serratus anterior muscle,1 but several cases with unilateral scapular winging as the presenting sign for C7 radiculopathy have been published.3 4 Clinical presentation of this patient was atypical for C7 radiculopathy. With the exception of the triceps muscles, he had no clinical involvement of other muscles supplied by the C7 or C8 segments.

Lesions of the spinal anterior horns in syringomyelia usually cause amyotrophy that begins in the small muscles of the hands, ascends to the forearms, and ultimately affects muscles of the shoulder girdle. The clinical presentation of our patient with isolated paresis of the serratus anterior and triceps muscles is therefore very unusual.

Apart from the intramedullary syrinx at C7/T1, cervical MRI also demonstrated a small hindbrain hernia. Syringomyelia usually arises as a result of an associated anomaly,—for example, the Arnold-Chiari malformation; the demonstrated hernia thus may be the aetiology of the syrinx.

Another interesting finding in this patient is the combination of syringomyelia with movement disturbances. Dystonia and other movement disorders in syringomyelia are rare, but have been recorded.5 6 Nevertheless, careful clinical examination suggested psychogenic dystonia in this patient.

The present case illustrates that a central lesion presumably of the C7 and C8 spinal cord segments may damage the serratus anterior motor nucleus on both sides and thus may cause bilateral scapular winging thereby mimicking a neuromuscular disorder.

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