Article Text

PDF
Parkinsonism in type 1 Gaucher’s disease
  1. M Spitz1,
  2. R Rozenberg2,
  3. P A A Silveira3,
  4. E R Barbosa4
  1. 1Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Department, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil
  2. 2Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Biology Institute, University of São Paulo
  3. 3Haematology Department, University of São Paulo Medical School
  4. 4Movement Disorders Unit, Neurology Department, University of São Paulo Medical School
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr Mariana Spitz
 marianaspitz{at}gmail.com

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Gaucher’s disease (GD) is the most common hereditary lysosomal storage disorder, with a prevalence of 1:57 000 in the general population.1 The disease results from mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene, localised in chromosome 1 (the most frequent mutation is N370S) and has an autosomal recessive pattern of transmission. As a result of such mutations, there is decreased activity of the enzyme and subsequent glucocerebroside accumulation in cells of the macrophage-monocyte system. This process may lead to hepatosplenomegaly, bone disease, and pancytopenia.

GD is classically divided into three types, according to the presence of neurological symptoms and the dynamics of the developing clinical picture.2 Type 1 GD is the most common, affects mainly Ashkenazi Jews, and until recently was considered non-neuronopathic. It may present at any age and its course and presentation are variable. Many type 1 GD patients remain virtually asymptomatic, being diagnosed during evaluation for a non-related disorder or familial screening of a symptomatic relative.

In juvenile GD (type 3), movement disorders are frequently found, but there is growing evidence that neurological symptoms, particularly parkinsonism, may also occur as a late complication of type 1 GD.

The following case report illustrates such situation. …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.