Article Text

PDF
Conus medullaris lesion causing bilateral lower limb myokymia
  1. Alexandra Sinclair,
  2. Nicholas Davies
  1. Department of Neuroscience, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK
  1. Dr A Sinclair, Department of Neuroscience, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK; a.b.sinclair{at}bham.ac.uk

Statistics from Altmetric.com

The word myokymia, derived from the Greek myo—muscle and kymos—wave, describes involuntary, continuous, slow, undulating contractions of muscle fibres.1 Electromyography of myokymia consists of short lived and often recurrent bursts of single motor unit potentials, firing at rates of 2–60 Hz.2 Myokymia can be focal or generalised and is usually associated with diffuse, central or peripheral nerve disorders. We describe a case of bilateral lower limb myokymia due to a focal lesion at the conus …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.