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Spontaneous intracranial hypotension in adolescence
  1. J Bladen1,
  2. M Moosajee2,
  3. S Renowden3,
  4. M Carter4,
  5. C Sainsbury5,
  6. P Jardine6
  1. 1Department of Neurosurgery, Barbara Russell Children’s Ward, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol, UK
  2. 2Department of Neurosurgery, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol, UK
  3. 3Department of Neurosurgery, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol, UK
  4. 4Department of Neurosurgery, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol, UK
  5. 5Child Health Department, Torbay Hospital, Torquay, UK
  6. 6Department of Paediatric Neurology, Barbara Russell Children’s Ward, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
 J Bladen
 Department of Neurosurgery, Barbara Russell Children’s Ward, Frenchay Hospital, Bristol BS 16 1LE, UK; bladenjohn{at}doctors.org.uk

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A 16-year-old boy presented with a 4-week history of sudden onset and progressively worsening occipital headache. Symptoms were exacerbated on sitting and standing, and initially alleviated with recumbency and on extensive neck flexion. There was no medical or familial history. He was a keen line skater, regularly executing back flips on a skating ramp. However, there was no history of trauma sustained preceding the onset of headache. …

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