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Intracranial hypertension after unilateral neck dissection
  1. Vinay A Shah1,
  2. Grace S Yang2,
  3. Russell Smith2,
  4. Andrew G Lee3
  1. 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  2. 2Department of Otolaryngology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  3. 3Department of Ophthalmology, The H Stanley Thompson Neuro-ophthalmology Clinic, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr A G Lee
 Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Dr, PFP, Iowa City, IA 52242-1091, USA; andrew-lee{at}uiowa.edu

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A 32-year-old, otherwise healthy man with recurrent metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma underwent total thyroidectomy with modified radical neck dissection on the right side that included removal of the internal jugular vein. On the second postoperative day, he had ipsilateral conjunctival chemosis. Three weeks later, he was referred for headache, pulse synchronous tinnitus and binocular horizontal diplopia. Examination showed bilateral chemosis (fig 1) and papilloedema (figs 1 and 2) with bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsies. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was …

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