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Hemimacropsia after medial temporo-occipital infarction
  1. Min-Gyu Park1,
  2. Kwang-Dong Choi1,
  3. Ji Soo Kim2,
  4. Kyung-Pil Park3,
  5. Dae-Seong Kim3,
  6. Hak Jin Kim4,
  7. Dae Soo Jung5
  1. 1Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea
  2. 2Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul, Korea
  3. 3Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea
  4. 4Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea
  5. 5Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan, Korea
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr K-D Choi
 Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, 1-10 Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 602-739, Korea; kdchoi{at}medimail.co.kr

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Dysmetropsia is a disorder of visual perception characterised by an apparent modification of the size of perceived objects.1–3 Objects can appear larger (macropsia) or smaller (micropsia) than their actual size. Dysmetropsia can result from retinal oedema causing a dislocation of the receptor cells and from lesions affecting other parts of extracerebral visual pathways. Transient micropsia can also result from epileptic seizure, migraine, infectious mononucleosis, the action of mescaline and other hallucinogenic drugs, and psychopathological phenomena.

Permanent dysmetropsia following focal cerebral lesions is rare. Most of the prior reports described hemimicropsia due to lesions mainly involving the lateral aspect of the visual association cortex.1–3 However, reports of hemimacropsia following focal cerebral lesions have been extremely rare1,4 and hemimacropsia following a focal vascular lesion has not been described previously. We describe a patient with left hemimacropsia due to right medial temporo-occipital infarction.

CASE REPORT

A 64-year-old right-handed man with hypertension was admitted 4 days after a sudden onset of visual disturbance. He …

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