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Ruptured intracranial dermoid
  1. Chandan Jyoti Das1,
  2. Mohammad Tahir2,
  3. Jyotindu Debnath3,
  4. Ghan Shyam Pangtey4
  1. 1Department of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  2. 2Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  3. 3Department of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  4. 4Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr C J Das
 Department of Radiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India; dascj{at}yahoo.com

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A 48-year-old man presented with sudden-onset headache and vomiting for 6 h and altered sensorium for 2 h. He was febrile with tachycardia, neck rigidity and positive Kernig’s sign. Cerebrospinal fluid examination showed neutrophilic pleocytosis, raised protein and low glucose. Non-contrast CT revealed a large, well-circumscribed hypodense mass measuring 5×3 cm involving the right frontobasal area with subtle peripheral calcification. The mean attenuation value of the hypodense area measured 87 Hounsfield units. MRI was performed to characterise the mass further (figs 1, 2).

Figure 1

 T1-weighted (TR/TE, 450/20) axial image showing a hyperintense soft tissue mass in the right frontobasal region with brightly hyperintense foci in the quadrigeminal cistern and subarachnoid space. Axial section at a higher …

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