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Superficial cerebral and spinal haemosiderosis caused by secondary tethered cord syndrome after resection of a spinal lymphoma
  1. Vera C Zingler1,
  2. Stefan Grau2,
  3. Jörg-Christian Tonn2,
  4. Klaus Jahn1,
  5. Jennifer Linn3,
  6. Thomas Brandt1,
  7. Michael Strupp1
  1. 1Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich, Germany
  2. 2Department of Neurosurgery, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich, Germany
  3. 3Department of Neuroradiology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich, Germany
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr Vera Carina Zingler
 Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistraße 15, D-81377 Munich, Germany; vzingler{at}med.uni-muenchen.de

Abstract

Superficial haemosiderosis results from chronic subarachnoid haemorrhage during which haemosiderin is deposited in the leptomeninges around the brain, spinal cord and cranial nerves. We describe an exceptional case of superficial haemosiderosis characterised by two special aspects. (1) The cause was a secondary tethered cord syndrome due to dural adhesions which had developed 8 years after resection of a thoracic lymphoma and (2) an explorative neurosurgical procedure with complete untethering caused normalisation of the cerebrospinal fluid and stopped disease progression.

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests: None.

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