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Diffusion tractography of axonal degeneration following shear injury
  1. M M Gold1,
  2. M L Lipton1,2
  1. 1
    Departments of Radiology, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA
  2. 2
    The Center for Advanced Brain Imaging, The Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA
  1. Michael L Lipton, MD, PhD, Departments of Radiology, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 111 East 210th St, Bronx, NY 10467, USA; mlipton{at}aecom.yu.edu

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A 22-year-old construction worker presented after falling from a scaffold onto the vertex of his head. After suffering a brief loss of consciousness in the field, the patient was alert and oriented and without neurological deficits upon arrival to the Emergency Room. CT of the head demonstrated two small haemorrhages in the posterior aspect of the body of the corpus callosum, consistent with shear injury (fig 1). The patient was observed overnight and discharged the next day. Over the next several years, the patient had persistent cognitive difficulties, including memory loss and poor …

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