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A note on X linked adrenoleukodystrophy (Addison–Schilder syndrome)
  1. J M S Pearce
  1. Department of Neurology, Hull Royal Infirmary and Hull York Medical School
  1. Dr J M S Pearce, Department of Neurology, Hull Royal Infirmary and Hull York Medical School, 304 Beverley Road Anlaby, East Yorks HU10 7BG, UK; jmsp{at}freenet.co.uk

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In one of the unsurpassed medical works of the nineteenth century,1 2 Thomas Addison (1793–1860) when investigating a “peculiar form of anaemia” described the classic symptoms of adrenal cortical failure and found pathological changes in both “suprarenal glands”—Addison’s disease. The ill-fatedi Paul Ferdinand Schilder (1886–1940) in 1913 reported3 three cases of “encephalitis periaxialis diffusa”, characterised by diffuse involvement of the cerebral white matter in children with severe myelin loss, fat-laden phagocytes and gliosis, which resembled multiple sclerosis, and was named Schilder’s disease. The two conditions appeared unrelated until Haberfeld and Spieler reported the combination of bronzed …

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