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Eosinophilic meningitis and an ocular worm in a patient from Kerala, south India
  1. N N Baheti1,
  2. M Sreedharan1,
  3. T Krishnamoorthy2,
  4. M D Nair1,
  5. K Radhakrishnan1
  1. 1
    Department of Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, India
  2. 2
    Departments of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, India
  1. Dr K Radhakrishnan, Professor and Head, Department of Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum–695011, Kerala, India; krk{at}sctimst.ac.in

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Angiostrongylus cantonesis is the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis worldwide.1 Rats serve as the definitive host of Angiostrongylus cantonesis, whereas humans become infected by ingesting third-stage larvae in raw intermediate hosts, such as snails, prawns, fish, frogs or monitor lizards.2 Infection has also rarely been acquired by the consumption of vegetables contaminated with infective larvae.3 4 Outside Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin, where the infection is endemic, Angiostrongylus eosinophilic meningitis is seldom encountered.2

A 40-year-old woman, a resident of Kerala, southern India, presented with a 3-week history of low-grade fever, headache and vomiting. Other than neck rigidity, neurological and systemic examinations were normal. The blood counts …

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