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Horner syndrome due to jugular vein thrombosis (Lemierre syndrome)
  1. M Habek1,
  2. D Petravić1,
  3. D Ozretić2,
  4. V V Brinar1
  1. 1
    Referral Center for Demyelinating Diseases of the Central Nervous System, University Department of Neurology, Zagreb School of Medicine and University Hospital Center, Zagreb, Croatia
  2. 2
    Department of Radiology, Zagreb School of Medicine and University Hospital Center, Zagreb, Croatia
  1. Mario Habek, MD, University Department of Neurology, Zagreb School of Medicine and University Hospital Center, Kišpatićeva 12, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia; mhabek{at}mef.hr

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A 60-year-old patient was referred to our Department for evaluation of anisocoria. His neurological examination revealed Horner syndrome on the right side. The rest of the examination was normal. Six months before, he had acute tonsillitis: throat cultures revealed a polymicrobial flora consisting of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, which was treated with 1 600 000 international units of bipenicillin intramuscularly for 10 days. On admission, he had a normal complete blood count, C-reactive protein and chest X-ray. Throat and blood cultures were normal. Brain multi-sliced …

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