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The “eye sign” in acute stroke: not necessarily poor outcome
  1. Y Friedman1,
  2. J A Pettersen1,
  3. R I Aviv2,
  4. B J Murray1
  1. 1
    Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  2. 2
    Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  1. Dr B J Murray, 2075 Bayview Ave—M1-600, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N 3M5; brian.murray{at}sunnybrook.ca

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A 75-year-old man with hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and prior coronary artery bypass surgery presented with a 1 h history of dysarthria. Examination was notable for a right gaze tendency that could not be overcome by oculocephalic manoeuvres, moderate facial droop and extensor plantar response. There was no neglect or anosagnosia. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 5. An urgent computed tomography (CT) scan, CT angiogram and CT perfusion study revealed occlusion of a distal branch of the right middle …

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