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Does rest tremor exclude the diagnosis of adult-onset primary dystonia?
  1. Roberto Erro1,2,
  2. Nial P Quinn1,
  3. Susanne A Schneider3,
  4. Kailash P Bhatia1
  1. 1 Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, University College London (UCL), Institute of Neurology, London, UK
  2. 2 Department of Neurological Science, University Federico II, Naples, Italy
  3. 3Department of Neurology, Kiel University, Kiel, Germany
  1. Correspondence to Professor Kailash P Bhatia, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, University College London (UCL), Institute of Neurology Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK; k.bhatia{at}ion.ucl.ac.uk

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The diagnosis of adult-onset primary dystonia (AOPD) is mainly clinical, but requires the exclusion of any secondary causes. AOPD is characterised by sustained involuntary muscle contraction resulting in one or more body parts moved away from their neutral position. No other neurological sign is observed, apart from tremor. The 1998 Movement Disorder Society Consensus on Tremor states indeed that tremor and dystonia can be associated, defining the tremor affecting a dystonic body part as ‘dystonic tremor’, and the tremor affecting a non-dystonic body part as ‘tremor associated …

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