Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Co-occurrence of affective and schizophrenia spectrum disorders with PINK1 mutations
  1. Susanne Steinlechner (susanne.steinlechner{at}psychiatrie.uk-sh.de)
  1. University of Luebeck, Germany
    1. Jessica Stahlberg (jessicastahlberg{at}aol.com)
    1. University of Luebeck, Germany
      1. Birgit Voelkel (birgit-voekel{at}web.de)
      1. University of Luebeck, Germany
        1. Ana Djarmati (ana.djarmati{at}gmail.com)
        1. University of Luebeck, Germany
          1. Johann Hagenah (johann.hagenah{at}neuro.uni-luebeck.de)
          1. University of Luebeck, Germany
            1. Anja Hiller (anja.hiller{at}neuro.uni.luebeck.de)
            1. University of Luebeck, Germany
              1. Katja Hedrich (katja.hedrich{at}neuro.uni-luebeck.de)
              1. University of Luebeck, Germany
                1. Inke Koenig (inke.koenig{at}imbs.uni-luebeck.de)
                1. University of Luebeck, Germany
                  1. Christine Klein (christine.klein{at}neuro.uni-luebeck.de)
                  1. University of Luebek, Germany
                    1. Rebekka Lencer (rebekka.lencer{at}psychiatrie.uk-sh.de)
                    1. University of Luebeck, Germany

                      Abstract

                      Objective: To investigate a possible association of mutations in the PINK1 gene with psychiatric disorders in a large family with monogenic parkinsonism.

                      Method: Twenty family members (four homozygous, eleven heterozygous and five non-mutation carriers) were investigated for the presence of psychiatric disorders using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV; information on three additional heterozygous mutation carriers was obtained according to the Family History Research Diagnostic Criteria.

                      Results: We found predominantly affective and schizophrenia spectrum disorders in 11 of the 18 (61%) mutation carriers and in one of five (20%) of the mutation-negative cases.

                      Conclusions: First, affective and psychotic symptoms may be part of the phenotypic spectrum or even the sole manifestation of PINK1 mutations. Second, patients with familial movement disorders associated with psychiatric conditions may serve as a valuable study population to explore (genetic) causes of neuro- psychiatric disease.

                      • PINK1 mutations
                      • bipolar disorders
                      • major depression
                      • parkinson's disease
                      • schizotypal personality disorder

                      Statistics from Altmetric.com

                      Request permissions

                      If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.