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Dementia and leukoencephalopathy due to lymphomatosis cerebri
  1. Jan Lewerenz (lewerenz{at}salk.edu)
  1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
    1. Xiaoqi Ding (ding{at}uke.uni-hamburg.de)
    1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
      1. Jakob Matschke (matschke{at}uke.uni-hamburg.de)
      1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
        1. Claudia Schnabel (c.schnabel{at}uke.uni-hamburg.de)
        1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
          1. Pedram Emami (p.emami{at}uke.uni-hamburg.de)
          1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
            1. Daniel von Borczyskowski (d.borczyskowski{at}uke.uni-hamburg.de)
            1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
              1. Ralph Buchert (buchert{at}uke.uni-hamburg.de)
              1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
                1. Thorsten Krieger (krieger{at}uke.uni-hamburg.de)
                1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
                  1. Maike de Wit (dewit{at}uke.uni-hamburg.de)
                  1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
                    1. Alexander Munchau (muenchau{at}uke.uni-hamburg.de)
                    1. University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany

                      Abstract

                      Lymphomatosis cerebri (LC) is a rare variant of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Clinically, the disease typically presents with a rapidly progressive dementia and unsteadiness of gait. Its presentation on cerebral MRI, which is characterised by diffuse leukoencephalopathy without contrast-enhancement, often causes diagnostic confusion[1] with suspected diagnoses ranging from Binswanger’s disease to leukoencephalopathy or encephalomyelitis. Here, we report a patient with subacute dementia and diffuse bilateral white matter changes in the cerebral hemispheres and additional involvement of the brain stem, basal ganglia and thalamus on MRI. Initially, she was considered to suffer from an autoimmune encephalitis, transiently responded to immunosuppression but then developed multiple solid-appearing cerebral lymphomas.

                      • dementia
                      • magnetic resonance imaging
                      • positron emission imaging
                      • primary central nervous system lymphoma
                      • white matter

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