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Long-term follow-up of the first 70 operated adults in the Göteborg epilepsy surgery series with respect to seizures, psychosocial outcome and use of anti-epileptic drugs
  1. Fredrik Asztely (fredrik.asztely{at}neuro.gu.se)
  1. Section of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Sweden
    1. Gerd Ekstedt (gerd.ekstedt{at}vgregion.se)
    1. Section of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Sweden
      1. Bertil Rydenhag (bertil.rydenhag{at}neuro.gu.se)
      1. Section of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Sweden
        1. Kristina Malmgren (kristina.malmgren{at}neuro.gu.se)
        1. Section of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Sweden

          Abstract

          Objective: To compare long-term (10 years) seizure outcome, psychosocial outcome, and use of anti-epileptic drugs (AED) with the two-year follow-up in adults after resective epilepsy surgery.

          Methods: All adults (n=70) who underwent resective epilepsy surgery from 1987 to1995 in the Göteborg Epilepsy Surgery Series were included. Fifty-four had had temporal lobe resections and 16 extra-temporal resections (12 frontal). A cross-sectional follow-up in the form of a semi-structured interview was performed in late 2003.

          Results: Mean follow-up was 12.4 years (range 8.6-16.2 years). Of the 70 patients (51% males) five (7%) were dead (three due to non-epilepsy related causes). Of the 65 patients interviewed 38 (58%) were seizure-free at the long-term follow-up, 65% of the patients with temporal lobe resections, and 36% of the patients with extra-temporal resections. Of the 35 patients who were seizure-free at the two-year follow-up three (9%) had seizures at the long-term follow-up. Of the 30 patients who had seizures at the two-year follow-up six (20%) were seizure-free at the long-term follow-up. Of all 65 patients 45 (69%) had the same seizure situation as compared with the two-year follow-up. Sixteen (25%) had an improved seizure situation and 4 (6%) had worsened. Of the seizure-free patients 11 (29%) had ceased taking AED, 28 (74%) were working and 25 (66%) had a driving license.

          Conclusions: Adult patients who are seizure-free two years after resective epilepsy surgery are most likely to still be seizure-free ten years later. Most of them are working and have obtained a driving license.

          • antiepileptic drugs
          • epilepsy surgery
          • long-term outcome
          • psychosocial outcome
          • seizure outcome

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