rss
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry doi:10.1136/jnnp-2012-302969
  • Impact commentaries
  • A MODERN PERSPECTIVE ON THE TOP 100 CITED JNNP PAPERS OF ALL TIME

The relevance of the Lewy body to the pathogenesis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease

Accuracy of clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease

  1. Andrew John Lees
  1. Correspondence to Professor A J Lees, Reta Lila Weston Institute of Neurological Studies, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London WC1N 1PJ, UK; andrew.lees{at}ucl.ac.uk
  • Accepted 11 April 2012
  • Published Online First 29 May 2012

Title: THE RELEVANCE OF THE LEWY BODY TO THE PATHOGENESIS OF IDIOPATHIC PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Authors: W R G Gibb, A J Lees

Published: 1988;51:745–52

Title: ACCURACY OF CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF IDIOPATHIC PARKINSON'S DISEASE: A CLINICO-PATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF 100 CASES

Authors: Andrew J Hughes, Susan E Daniel, Linda Kilford, Andrew J Lees

Published: 1992;55:181–4

Professor Andrew Lees of the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square describes the clinico-pathological studies at the Queen Square Brain Bank that have led to improved diagnostic accuracy of Parkinson's syndromes in neurological practice

During my undergraduate training at the London Hospital, Whitechapel, the teaching autopsy was an eagerly anticipated ritual. The whole medical firm would troop across the road from the hospital to the mortuary where a clinician, often the consultant, would present the history and physical signs of the deceased and then the morbid anatomists would reveal the macroscopic pathological findings. Henry Urich perched on a ledge next to the cadaver would, with his exotic Eastern European accent, lead the discussion on all the neurological cases while we remained transfixed looking down in awe from the gallery. The naked eye appearances of the sliced brain allowed him to suspect diagnoses such as Parkinson's disease and exposed other pathologies, such as tumours and haemorrhage. These demonstrations taught me the rudiments of the classical anatomo-clinical neurological method, the great level of uncertainty relating to the cause of death that existed in so many cases, the frequency of multiple pathologies in an individual case and most of all the need for humility. A decade later autopsy rates began to tumble in the UK and the teaching autopsy was on its last legs; but for a few dissenting voices, nobody seemed to care. The opportunities to do …

No Related Web Pages

Podcasts
Visit the full archive of podcasts for JNNP here >>

Free sample
This recent issue is free to all users to allow everyone the opportunity to see the full scope and typical content of JNNP.
View free sample issue >>

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the articles as they are published.

Navigate This Article