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Amyloid imaging in Alzheimer's disease: comparison of florbetapir and Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography
  1. David A Wolk1,2,
  2. Zheng Zhang3,
  3. Sanaa Boudhar4,
  4. Christopher M Clark5,
  5. Michael J Pontecorvo5,
  6. Steven E Arnold2,6
  1. 1Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  2. 2Penn Memory Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  3. 3Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
  4. 4American College of Radiology Imaging Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  5. 5Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  6. 6Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr David A Wolk, Penn Memory Center, 3615 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; david.wolk{at}uphs.upenn.edu

Abstract

Background Amyloid imaging provides in vivo detection of the fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand, Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB-C11), is the most well studied amyloid imaging agent, but the short half-life of carbon-11 limits its clinical viability. Florbetapir-F18 recently demonstrated in vivo correlation with postmortem Aβ histopathology, but has not been directly compared with PiB-C11.

Methods Fourteen cognitively normal adults and 12 AD patients underwent PiB-C11 and florbetapir-F18 PET scans within a 28-day period.

Results Both ligands displayed highly significant group discrimination and correlation of regional uptake.

Conclusion These data support the hypothesis that florbetapir-F18 provides comparable information with PiB-C11.

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • memory
  • event-related potentials
  • cognition

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Footnotes

  • Funding This study was supported in its entirety by the Pennsylvania Department of Health (#4100037703).

  • Competing interests Dr Wolk has received consulting fees from GE Healthcare, Inc. Drs Clark and Pontecorvo owned Avid stock and/or stock options and are employed by Avid Radiopharmaceuticals Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly and Company.

  • Ethics approval Ethics approval was provided by University of Pennsylvania Institutional Review Board.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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