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Mediterranean food for thought?
  1. Nikolaos Scarmeas1,2,3
  1. 1Taub Institute for Research in Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, the Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, New York, New York, USA
  2. 2Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
  3. 3Department of Social Medicine, Psychiatry and Neurology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
  1. Correspondence to Dr Nikolaos Scarmeas, Department of Neurology, Columbia University Medical Center, Sergievsky Center, 622 West 168th street, PH 19th floor, New York, NY 10032, USA; ns257{at}columbia.edu

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Or Martinez-Lapiscina et al report results of a clinical trial of two different versions of a Mediterranean type diet (MedDiet)1 versus a standard low fat diet. The parent trial (PREDIMED) was focused on prevention of cardiovascular disease but cognitive outcomes (using the MMSE and the Clock Drawing Test) were the focus of this report. After a mean of 6½ years, cognitive differences (∼half a point in MMSE) in favour of MedDiet plus olive oil and trends of cognitive differences in favour of MedDiet plus nuts were noted. The associations were present (or even strengthened) after adjusting for multiple potential confounders.

The exploration of the relation of MedDiet with neurological diseases has started only very recently and …

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