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Clinicoradiological correlation of singultus centre
  1. Suhas Udayakumaran1,
  2. Parasuraman Ayiramuthu2
  1. 1Division of Paediatric Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Kochi, Kerala, India
  2. 2Department of Neurosurgery, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and research Centre, Kochi, Kerala, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Suhas Udayakumaran, Division of Paediatric Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala 682041, India; dr.suhas{at}gmail.com

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Illustrative case 1

Thirty-nine-year-old male presented with intractable hiccups of 3 years duration. MRI showed a left dorsolateral medullary cavernoma. The hiccups initially responded to steroids and baclofen and later reappeared. As the size of the lesion increased, the patient developed lower cranial nerve involvement with disappearance of hiccups. At this stage, he underwent surgery with uneventful recovery.

Illustrative case 2

Forty-year-old male presented to us with intractable hiccups and change in voice. Evaluation revealed vocal cord palsy. MR demonstrated Chiari malformation with cervical syringomyelia and syringobulbia figure 1. He underwent foramen magnum decompression with relief of his intractable hiccups over a period of a month.

Figure 1

Illustrative case 2. Forty-year-old male presented to us with singultus with progressive appearance of …

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