eLetters

209 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • Parkinson’s disease with camptocormia: a new horizon for treatment
    Dr. Sandip Kumar Dash

    Dear Editor,

    I have read all the three articles (1), (2), (3), published in Vol .77, 2006, and found them to be very good studies. It also gives a new nsight to Parkinson’s disease and seems to be very useful in our day to day practice. In this connection I would like to add a few things.

    Camptocormia was first described by Brodie, in 1918. Reichel G et al, (4) proposed for new classification for cam...

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  • Reply to “Which EEG for Epilepsy” by Leach et al.
    Donald L. Gilbert

    Dear Editor,

    Leach et al (“Which electroencephalography (EEG) for epilepsy? The relative usefulness of different EEG protocols in patients with possible epilepsy.” Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. 2006;77:1040-2) compared the yield of 3 types of EEGs in 85 patients with epilepsy, diagnosed after two or more generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCs). The median age of the patients was 17.9 years...

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  • A case of transient global amnesia after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy
    Yuko Wada

    Dear Editor,

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a clinical syndrome characterized by a sudden onset of anterograde and retrograde amnesia in the absence of other neurological signs and symptoms, which is resolved within 24 hours. Although the etiology of TGA remains unknown, recently Lewis 1) suggested that a Valsalva-like action appears to be a common triggering event among patients with TGA. Although TGA follow...

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  • Which electroencephalography (EEG) for epilepsy? The relative usefulness of different EEG protocols
    Dr .Sandip Kumar Dash

    Dear Editor,

    I have read your article(1) with interest ,which is also a very good study .However, in this connection I would like to mention that ,in your study the mean time of recording the EEG is almost double in sleep deprivation EEG than that of routine EEG. Whether this long duration of recording in sleep deprived cases has given much more abnormal EEG than that of others and whether sleep deprived EEG should b...

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  • Differences in Circadian Variation of Cerebral Thrombosis and Embolic Brain Infarction by Situation
    Shinichi Omama

    Dear editor

    In response to our article, Spengos et al. suggested that we should evaluate the circadian variation of stroke onset separately for the aetiologically different subtypes of ischaemic stroke. Stroke diagnostic criteria of the registry in our study are based essentially on MONICA manual version 1.1, which classifies cerebral infarction (CIF) into that due to cerebral thrombosis (TMB), embolic brain infarction...

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  • Acute limbic encephalitis associated with hemophagocytic syndrome
    Takashi Shiihara

    Dear Editor,

    Samarasekera et al. reported four patients with non- paraneoplastic acute limbic encephalitis (ALE), who had negative testing for voltage-gated potassium channel auto-antibodies[1]. We wish to report a patient with a previously unreported association of ALE with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) and discuss the possible pathophysiology.

    A 9-year-old boy, the second child of healthy non-consanguin...

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  • Cluster headache improved by physical exercise
    Karl E. Ekbom

    Dear Editor,

    I read the case reports of Gotkine et al 1 with great interest and definitely agree with their suggestion that an increase in sympathetic activity may reverse the pain in cluster headache. We saw already in the late 1960´s that spontaneous attacks of cluster headache are not seldom preceded by a shift of the vegetative tone in a parasympathetic direction. Furthermore, the attacks are fairly often associated...

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  • Migraine and unilateral giveway motor weakness: atypical, pseudo-paretic behavioural epiphenomenon
    Vinod K Gupta

    Dear Editor,

    In their paper on unilateral motor ‘deficits’, Young and colleagues [1] report a less-studied aspect of migraine pathophysiology. In contrast to the experience of this tertiary headache-care centre, my own experience of managing migraine patients between 1976-2006 suggests that a vague upper limb motor involvement is an uncommon feature, not associated with objective weakness or functional limitation or...

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  • Myotonic dystrophy; practical issues relating to assessment of strength; authors reply
    R G Whittaker

    Dear Editor,

    Hand held dynamometry measures the strength of the long finger flexor muscles and is therefore eminently suitable to the study of myotonic dystrophy and other distal myopathies. The dynamometer used in this study is available for approximately £135 and weighs less than one kilogam. In our experience, patients found it easy to use. We acknowledge that this technique may not be suitable for some severely affe...

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  • Measuring strength in myotonic dystrophy
    Kazuo Abe

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the article by Whittaker et al. I completely agree that the MRC scale is unsuitable for detecting the small changes in strength seen in a slowly progressive disease such as myotonic dystrophy (MD). However, I also wonder what strength a hand-held dynamometers measure. MD is a disease that affects limb muscles in the distal especially in hand muscles. Hand-held dynamometers may...

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