547 e-Letters

  • Short Montreal Cognitive Assessment (s-MOCA): validation study
    Andrew J. Larner

    Roalf et al. describe a short form of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (s-MOCA) comprising 8 items (score range 0-16) from the original MoCA.

    Data from a historical cohort administered the MoCA (n = 150)1 were examined to extract s-MoCA scores. There was high correlation between s- MoCA scores and MoCA and MMSE scores (0.94, 0.80 respectively).

    s-MoCA scores differed significantly (null hypothesis r...

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  • Response to 'The prognosis of acute symptomatic seizures after ischaemic stroke'.
    Elizabeth C. Galizia

    We read with interest the findings and recommendations by the authors. (1)

    Cerebrovascular disease accounts for the increasing burden of seizures and epilepsy in people over the age of 65 years. The distinction between acute and remote symptomatic seizures is highly relevant with implications both for prognosis and clinical management. Acute symptomatic seizures (ASS) following a cerebrovascular event are def...

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  • Leg stereotypy disorder: Not true stereotypy
    Sanjay Pandey
    We read the viewpoint on leg stereotypy1 by Joseph Jankovic with great interest. He has described leg stereotypy as repetitive, 1-4 Hz flexion extension, abduction-adduction movement at hips when the patient is seated and the feet rest on the floor.1 This movement has also been described to manifest as flexion extension at the knee joint or as tapping movement of foot.1 Patients as per this description have also been found to have...
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  • Meta-analysis by Xu et al. suffers from critical errors
    Evangelos Evangelou

    The meta-analysis by Xu et al is a valiant effort to map the evidence for modifiable risk factors of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). We acknowledge this huge effort, however, we have serious concerns regarding the systematic appraisal and the synthesis of the available data.

    On top of the critique by Drs. Wu and Brayne (e-letter), a comprehensive assessment of the article and its results can reveal critical error...

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  • Re:"Correction to odds ratio"
    Sascha K?pke

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Dr. Solari for pointing out an aspect of possible misunderstanding, but surely not incorrectness. We agree that the reverse odds ratio of 5.63 (95% CI 2.87 to 11.05, p<0.001) would more clearly refer to the odds of achieving informed choice. Still the reported odds ratio of 0.18 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.35, p<0.001) gives exactly the same information and is probably more intuitively underst...

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  • "Correction to odds ratio"
    Alessandra Solari

    I enjoyed reading the paper of Sascha Kopke et al. [1] on the efficacy of an evidence-based information program for people with recently diagnosed multiple sclerosis. I noticed, however that the odds ratio (OR) for the primary endpoint (achieving 'informed choice') is incorrect, both in the Abstract and in the Results.

    Abstract: 'For the primary endpoint, a significant difference was shown with 50 of 85 (59%) pa...

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  • Thiamine compounds in humans
    Marco Poloni

    I have some comments concerning the report by S. Jesse, D.R. Thal and A.C. Ludolph, recently published in JNNP September 15 2015, pag. 1166-1168 "Thiamine deficiency in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis". In a research dated 1981 Rindi et al. showed that in 12 CSF samples obtained from different healthy subjects, without any clinical disorder involving thiamin status, the only thiamin compounds detected after electrophoretic...

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  • Cholinesterase inhibitors and falls in Parkinson's disease
    Martijn L.T.M. Muller

    We read with great interest the paper by Pagano et al. who conducted a systematic review of prospective, randomised placebo-controlled trials (RCT), in order to assess the efficacy and safety of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChIs) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).[1] They concluded that ChIs are effective in the treatment of cognitive impairment in patients with PD. We concur with the authors' nuanced conclusion in...

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  • Comments on "Meta-analysis of modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease"
    Yu-Tzu Wu

    The meta-analysis by Xu et al., (2015)[1] reviews over 300 papers and identified 93 modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Among these risk factors, population attributable risks (PAR) of nine important factors were estimated to contribute to up to 66% of Alzheimer's disease cases globally. We acknowledge the great effort of this massive review but there are some substantial analytical issues which should be highl...

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  • Treatment of neuropsychiatric syndromes in Alzheimer's disease (AD): In search of evidence?
    Amir A. Sepehry

    We read with interest the recent systematic review and meta-analysis, "Pharmacological treat-ment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease"(1). By examining the evidence for treating heterogeneous range of neuropsychiatric syndromes in persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), this study found favorable results for the use of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) and atyp-ical antipsychotics albeit with risk of side ef...

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