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Two families with autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, pigmented maculopathy, and dementia
  1. Stewart Webba,
  2. Victor Pattersonb,
  3. Michael Hutchinsona
  1. aDepartment of Neurology, St Vincent’s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4, Ireland, bDepartment of Neurology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, BT12 6BA, Northern Ireland
  1. Dr Stewart Webb, Department of Neurology, St Vincent’s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE Two families with autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia and pigmented maculopathy are described.

METHODS All family members were examined by two neurologists. An assessment of cognitive function in affected members was made using the mini mental state examination (MMSE) or Cambridge cognitive examination (CAMCOG).

RESULTS Six patients from two families presented with a slowly progressive, autosomal recessive, spastic tetraplegia. Although they were always considered to be intellectually slower than their peers, further intellectual deterioration was noted during the second decade. Five had a pigmented maculopathy with mild decrease in visual acuity and all had distal amyotrophy, mild cerebellar signs, and developed faecal and urinary incontinence late in the course of the disease.

CONCLUSION The association of hereditary spastic paraplegia and pigmented maculopathy has rarely been described; only 11 families with 32 affected members have been reported, showing considerable heterogeneity in presentation. These described conditions may be allelic or more probably reflect mutations at different genetic loci.

  • hereditary spastic paraplegia
  • maculopathy
  • dementia
  • Kjellin’s syndrome

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