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The rostrocaudal gradient for somatosensory perception in the human postcentral gyrus
  1. K TAKEDA
  1. Department of Rehabilitation, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, Tokyo Metropolitan Organisation for Medical Research, Tokyo, Japan
  2. Department of Neurology, School of Medicine Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan
  3. Department of Radiology, School of Medicine Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan
  1. Dr Katsuhiko Takeda k-takeda{at}umin.ac.jp
  1. K TAKEDA,
  2. Y SHOZAWA,
  3. M SONOO,
  4. T SHIMIZU
  1. Department of Rehabilitation, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, Tokyo Metropolitan Organisation for Medical Research, Tokyo, Japan
  2. Department of Neurology, School of Medicine Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan
  3. Department of Radiology, School of Medicine Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan
  1. Dr Katsuhiko Takeda k-takeda{at}umin.ac.jp
  1. T KAMINAGA
  1. Department of Rehabilitation, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, Tokyo Metropolitan Organisation for Medical Research, Tokyo, Japan
  2. Department of Neurology, School of Medicine Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan
  3. Department of Radiology, School of Medicine Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan
  1. Dr Katsuhiko Takeda k-takeda{at}umin.ac.jp

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Anatomical organisation of the primate postcentral gyrus has been described in terms of several different cytoarchitectures.1 2 Powell and Mountcastle stated that the area 3 was a typical koniocortex with granular cells, whereas in areas 1 and 2 the morphological characteristics changed gradually to the homotypical parietal association cortex in the monkeyMacaca mulatta.1 Iwamuraet al reported the physiological correlates on the anatomical rostrocaudal axis in monkeys.2 The ratio of skin neurons to total neurons was the largest in area 3b and decreased gradually toward the caudal part of the postcentral gyrus.2 Specific types of stimulation such as rubbing of the skin in certain directions were effective in activating some of the caudal part of the postcentral gyrus. The anatomical and physiological data in the primate lead to the reasonabe hypothesis that there is a rostrocaudal functional gradient within the postcentral gyrus. This notion may explain why a lesion in the postcentral gyrus causes varied sensory disturbance in various people.

A 49 year old right handed man suddenly developed dysaesthesia in the right hand. This recovered gradually, but 1 month later he still had an impaired tactile recognition for objects. His voluntary movements were skillful. …

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