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Headache as the only neurological sign of cerebral venous thrombosis: a series of 17 cases
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  • Published on:
    Authors' reply

    Dear Editor,

    We totally agree with Dr Prabhu that CT venography is an excellent tool for the diagnosis of CVT and we indeed occasionally use it but, whenever possible, we prefer the combination of MRI/MRV. The obvious advantage of the MRI is the direct visualization of the clot itself with its different signals according to the duration of thrombosis. It can also show, more precisely than CT scan, the associated cer...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    CT scan technique is unclear from study

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the article looking at headache as an isloated symptom of venous thrombosis. As a radiologist, I was interested in the assertion that a "normal CT scan" necessitated a MRI/MRV scan. In my experience if the symptomatology is atypical, performing a CT venogram, particularly on the multislice CT scanner can give an accurate result in a large proportion of cases. We perform CT venog...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Headache as the sole manifestation of cerebral venous thrombosis
    • Sudhir Kumar, Consultant Neurologist
    • Other Contributors:
      • Sndhya, G Rajshekher, Subhashini Prabhakar

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the recent article by Bousser et al., where they report a series of 17 patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) presenting with headache alone. However, we would like to make certain observations.

    Firstly, nine patients (60%) had abnormal computerized tomography (CT) findings (hyperdensity of one or more sinuses), however the authors mention, in the “Methods” sectio...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    CVT present with seizure alone

    Dear Editor,

    I read your well made article with great interest. This condition is very common in our institution, consisting about three to five admissions per month or even more in the summer months. A vast majority are in the post partum period patients. This condition is especially high here probably due to some socio-cultural habits of the inhabitants. The beliefs they enact are withholding fluid intake in the...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.