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Auditory nerve compression: a forgotten treatable cause for tinnitus
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  • Published on:
    Don't forget to look for a cause in tinnitus

    I thank the editor for the opportunity to respond to a letter to the editor entitled 'Forget auditory nerve compression as a treatable cause for tinnitus' by Dr Folmer.

    It states that in my editorial comment reality concerning tinnitus is distorted and, more specifically, that 1. many effective, non-surgical, non-pharmacologic management strategies are available and helpful for patients who experience tinnitus; 2. audit...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Forget auditory nerve compression as a treatable cause for tinnitus

    Dr. De Ridder overstates reality in the title of his editorial, "Auditory nerve compression: a forgotten treatable cause for tinnitus" and distorts reality in the text of the commentary. Examples of distortion include: there are no effective treatments available for most cases of tinnitus; auditory nerve compression is a common cause of tinnitus; carbamazepine and microvascular decompression surgery are viable treatment...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    VESTIBULAR PAROXYSMIA
    • Sabino G. Echebarria, NEUROLOGIST- BASQUE HEALTH SERVICE-OSAKIDETZA/ NEUROLOGY AREA - H.SAN ELOY ( BARKALDO-BIZKAIA )DISTR
    • Other Contributors:
      • -

    Vestibular paroxysmia has been defined classically by series of rotational to-and-fro vertigo, precipitated or modulated by head position.Then , descriptional basis of the clinical picture may be disclosed if vertigo may be associated to hipoacusis and tinitus or not.

    In the case of pure tinnitus description , the loud / low pitch sound of the tinnitus may be defined as paroxysmal tinnitus. Ethilogical purposes...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.