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Review
Biomarkers in dementia: clinical utility and new directions
  1. R M Ahmed1,
  2. R W Paterson2,
  3. J D Warren2,
  4. H Zetterberg3,4,
  5. J T O'Brien5,
  6. N C Fox2,
  7. G M Halliday1,
  8. J M Schott2
  1. 1Neuroscience Research Australia and the University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2Dementia Research Centre, University College London Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
  3. 3Department of Molecular Neuroscience, University College London Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
  4. 4Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Mölndal, Sweden
  5. 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr J M Schott, Dementia Research Centre, University College London Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK; j.schott{at}ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

Imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood-based biomarkers have the potential to improve the accuracy by which specific causes of dementia can be diagnosed in vivo, provide insights into the underlying pathophysiology, and may be used as inclusion criteria and outcome measures for clinical trials. While a number of imaging and CSF biomarkers are currently used for each of these purposes, this is an evolving field, with numerous potential biomarkers in varying stages of research and development. We review the currently available biomarkers for the three most common forms of neurodegenerative dementia, and give an overview of research techniques that may in due course make their way into the clinic.

  • ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
  • DEMENTIA
  • FRONTAL LOBE
  • BRAIN MAPPING
  • COGNITION

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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