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Research paper
Flortaucipir tau PET imaging in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia
  1. Sara J Makaretz1,
  2. Megan Quimby1,
  3. Jessica Collins1,
  4. Nikos Makris2,
  5. Scott McGinnis1,3,
  6. Aaron Schultz4,5,
  7. Neil Vasdev6,
  8. Keith A Johnson3,5,6,
  9. Bradford C Dickerson1,4,5
  1. 1 Frontotemporal Disorders Unit, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2 Center for Morphometric Analysis, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
  3. 3 Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  4. 4 Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA
  5. 5 Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  6. 6 Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Bradford C Dickerson, MGH Frontotemporal Disorders Unit, 149 13th St., Suite 2691, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA; brad.dickerson{at}mgh.harvard.edu

Footnotes

  • Contributors Data collection and analysis: SJM, MQ, KAJ, BCD. Manuscript drafting: all authors.

  • Funding This study was supported by the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R01 DC014296), National Institute on Aging (R21 AG051987, R01 AG046396, P01 AG036694,P50 AG00513421), and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (R21 NS077059). This research was carried out in whole or in part at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at the Massachusetts General Hospital, using resources provided by the Center for Functional Neuroimaging Technologies, P41EB015896, a P41 Biotechnology Resource Grant supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health. This work also involved the use of instrumentation supported by the NIH Shared Instrumentation Grant Program and/or High-End Instrumentation Grant Program; specifically,grant number(s) S10RR021110, S10RR023043, S10RR023401.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval Partners Human Research Committee.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Data collection and analysis: SJM, MQ, KAJ, BCD. Manuscript drafting: all authors.

  • Funding This study was supported by the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R01 DC014296), National Institute on Aging (R21 AG051987, R01 AG046396, P01 AG036694,P50 AG00513421), and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (R21 NS077059). This research was carried out in whole or in part at the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at the Massachusetts General Hospital, using resources provided by the Center for Functional Neuroimaging Technologies, P41EB015896, a P41 Biotechnology Resource Grant supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health. This work also involved the use of instrumentation supported by the NIH Shared Instrumentation Grant Program and/or High-End Instrumentation Grant Program; specifically,grant number(s) S10RR021110, S10RR023043, S10RR023401.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval Partners Human Research Committee.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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