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Prevalence and associated physical symptoms of depressive and anxiety symptoms in neurology outpatient clinic
  1. Zezhi Li1,
  2. Yong Hao1,
  3. Yan Han2,
  4. Shuai Wu2,
  5. Desheng Zhu3,
  6. Mingyuan Liu2,
  7. Qiang Dong3,
  8. Xin Wang4,
  9. Yangtai Guan
  1. 1 Department of Neurology, Ren Ji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
  2. 2 Department of Neurology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Secondary Military Medical University, Shanghai, China
  3. 3 Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  4. 4 Department of Neurology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  1. Correspondence to Professor Yangtai Guan, Department of Neurology, Ren Ji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 200127 Shanghai, China; yangtaiguan{at}sina.com

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Introduction

The co-occurrence of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a variety of neurological conditions are widely common and disabling. Furthermore, it could persist for a long time and interfere in the development of neurological disorders, and affect the prognosis of neurological disorders.1 However, despite their high incidence and jeopardy, depressive and anxiety symptoms remain under-recognised and undertreated.2 Most previous studies focused on depressive and anxiety symptoms in specific neurological diseases such as stroke, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. However, the prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms in neurological diseases were reported differently, and few studies reported the situation in Asia. Furthermore, a number of outpatients are newly referred to general neurology clinics for different symptoms such as headache, dizziness, cerebrovascular diseases and insomnia. Hence, the prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms in these new patients at the neurology outpatient clinic remains unclear, and the symptoms which predict the experience of depressive and anxiety symptoms are still ambiguous.

We aimed to investigate the prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms in newly referred patients at the general neurology outpatient clinics and determine the correlates for occurrence of these symptoms.

Methods

Patients newly referred at the general neurology outpatient clinics were recruited from three centres in Shanghai (Shanghai Huashan, Shanghai Changhai, and Shanghai Zhongshan Hospital) during 17 January 2009 to 21 January 2011.

Patients were screened randomly using random number table by resident neurologists followed by interview of attending doctors. Demographic information was collected and the Patient Health Questionnaire Depression (PHQ-9) as well as Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire scale (GAD-7) were used for assessing depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. When the patients with score of …

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Footnotes

  • ZL and YH contributed equally.

  • Contributors Qiang Dong, Xin Wang, and Yangtai Guan contributed to the overall design of the study. Yong Hao, Shuai Wu, and Yan Han involved in sample collection. Desheng Zhu, and Mingyuan Liu undertook the statistical analysis and interpretation of data. Zezhi Li wrote the draft of the manuscript. All authors have contributed to approve the final manuscript.

  • Funding This study was funded by National Natural Science Foundation of China (81230027, 81771295), Shanghai Natural Science Foundation (15ZR1412900), Summit & Plateau Key Discipline Construction Foundation of Shanghai Education Commission (TM201508), Shanghai Medical Planning Commission's Clinical Special Project of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine (ZHYY-ZXYJHZX-1-201701), Shanghai Jiao Tong University Medical Engineering Foundation (YG2015MS52, YG2016MS48). Pfizer, China partly sponsored the study.

  • Disclaimer All funding agencies for this study had no further role in study design, data analysis and in the decision to submit the paper for publication.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by Institutional Review Boards of Zhongshan Hospital.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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