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Seizures and movement disorders: phenomenology, diagnostic challenges and therapeutic approaches
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  • Published on:
    Seizures and movement disorders : cortico-subcortical networks
    • Aileen McGonigal, Consultant Epileptologist Aix Marseille Univ, Inserm, INS, Institut de Neurosciences des Systèmes, Marseille, France

    Seizures and movement disorders : cortico-subcortical networks

    Dr Aileen McGonigal

    Aix Marseille Univ, Inserm, INS, Institut de Neurosciences des Systèmes, Marseille, France
    APHM, Timone Hospital, Clinical Neurophysiology, Marseille, France

    Corresponding author: Dr Aileen McGonigal, Service de Neurophysiologie Clinique, CHU Timone, AP-HM, Marseille, France
    Email : aileen.mcgonigal@univ-amu.fr
    Tel: 00 33 491384995
    Fax:00 33 491385826

    To the Editors

    I was interested to read the recent review by Dr Freitas and colleagues1. This interesting article highlights diagnostic challenges, clinical overlap and possible shared pathophysiological processes in epileptic seizures and movement disorders. I would like to add a couple of points that seem important to acknowledge.
    Firstly, in terms of clinical expression, the authors rightly mention that automatic movements occurring during focal epileptic seizures can sometimes resemble those seen in certain movement disorders, and they give the examples of orofacial automatisms (most often seen in temporal lobe seizures), as well as hyperkinetic behaviors. While the authors highlight sleep-related epilepsy as the main cause of hyperkinetic behavior, in fact hyperkinetic behavior may be seen in seizures from various cortical origins both in wakefulness and in sleep. It should be recognized that especially (though not exclusivel...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.