Article Text

Original research
Ten-year risks of recurrent stroke, disability, dementia and cost in relation to site of primary intracerebral haemorrhage: population-based study
  1. Linxin Li,
  2. Ramon Luengo-Fernandez,
  3. Susanna M Zuurbier,
  4. Nicola C Beddows,
  5. Philippa Lavallee,
  6. Louise E Silver,
  7. Wilhelm Kuker,
  8. Peter Malcolm Rothwell
  1. Centre for Prevention of Stroke and Dementia, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Peter Malcolm Rothwell, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD, UK; peter.rothwell{at}ndcn.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

Background Patients with primary intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) are at increased long-term risks of recurrent stroke and other comorbidities. However, available estimates come predominantly from hospital-based studies with relatively short follow-up. Moreover, there are also uncertainties about the influence of ICH location on risks of recurrent stroke, disability, dementia and quality of life.

Methods In a population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study/2002–2018) of patients with a first ICH with follow-up to 10 years, we determined the long-term risks of recurrent stroke, disability, quality of life, dementia and hospital care costs stratified by haematoma location.

Results Of 255 cases with primary ICH (mean/SD age 75.5/13.1), 109 (42.7%) had lobar ICH, 144 (56.5%) non-lobar ICH and 2 (0.8%) had uncertain location. Annual rates of recurrent ICH were higher after lobar versus non-lobar ICH (lobar=4.0%, 2.7–7.2 vs 1.1%, 0.3–2.8; p=0.02). Moreover, cumulative rate of dementia was also higher for lobar versus non-lobar ICH (n/% lobar=20/36.4% vs 16/20.8%, p=0.047), and there was a higher proportion of disability at 5 years in survivors (15/60.0% vs 9/31.0%, p=0.03). The 10-year quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were also lower after lobar versus non-lobar ICH (2.9 vs 3.8 for non-lobar, p=0.04). Overall, the mean 10-year censor-adjusted costs were £19 292, with over 80% of costs due to inpatient hospital admission costs, which did not vary by haematoma location (p=0.90).

Conclusion Compared with non-lobar ICH, the substantially higher 10-year risks of recurrent stroke, dementia and lower QALYs after lobar ICH highlight the need for more effective prevention for this patient group.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors LL collected data, did the statistical analysis and interpretation, wrote and revised the manuscript. RL-F collected data, and did the statistical analysis and interpretation of the results. SMZ, PL, LES, WK and NCB collected the data and revised the manuscript. PMR conceived and designed the overall study, provided study supervision and funding, acquired, analysed and interpreted data, and wrote and revised the manuscript.

  • Funding The Oxford Vascular Study is funded by the National Institute for Health Research Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Wellcome Trust, Wolfson Foundation and British Heart Foundation. LL is in receipt of a fellowship award from the Medical Research Foundation.

  • Disclaimer The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval OXVASC was approved by the local research ethics committee (OREC A: 05/Q1604/70).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available upon reasonable request. Requests for access to data from the Oxford Vascular Study will be considered by the corresponding author.

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