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Migraine and risk of stroke
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  • Published on:
    Migraine and risk of stroke: complexities of population-based studies that do allow emergence of migraine science from the shadows of the past 100 years.
    • Vinod Gupta, Physician-Medical Director Migraine-Headache Institute, Gupta Medical Centre, New Delhi, INDIA

    I read the review by Øie et al. on the possible link between migraine and stroke (1). The authors believe that migraineurs are more likely to have unfavourable vascular risk factors. The increased risk of stroke seems to be more apparent among migraineurs without traditional risk factors (1). The mechanism behind the migraine- stroke association is unknown and clinical implications are uncertain (1).

    While migraine and stroke are independently common disorders, the occurrence of migraine-related stroke, in particular ischemic stroke in migraine with aura (MA), is uncommon to rare. Risk of ischaemic stroke associated with migraine without aura (MO) is uncertain (1). MO is by far the larger cohort (~80%), and, the striking absence of link of MO with ischemic stroke (1) merits greater attention. Additionally, as underscored by the authors, longer cumulative exposure to MA, as would be expected with early onset of migraine, is not associated with increased stroke risk in late life (1), an unexplained clinical paradox. The link between migraine and stroke is extremely tenuous and needs a careful re-examination. The authors (1) make no attempt to clarify that, fundamentally, no pathophysiologic difference between MA and MO has been established, and, both cohorts believed to be nosologically distinct respond equally well to abortive and preventive management strategies. What is truly challenging is the scientific basis and logic of the entirely arbitrary creation of noso...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.