Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Deep brain stimulation ‘probably’ works on patients with tardive syndromes
  1. Chencheng Zhang,
  2. Bomin Sun
  1. Neurosurgery Department, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Medical School Affiliated Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai, China
  1. Correspondence to Professor Bomin Sun, Neurosurgery Department, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Medical School Affiliated Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai 200025, China; sbm11224{at}rjh.com.cn

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Moving forward to well-controlled trials in tardive syndromes

Tardive syndromes (TDS) refer to the clinical spectrum of persistent hyperkinetic, hypokinetic and sensory phenomena that stem from chronic exposure to dopamine receptor-blocking drugs. Correspondingly, the clinical presentation of three times a day is diverse. Although three times a day have been a major area of movement disorder clinical practice for decades, their pathophysiological bases remain poorly understood, and the optimal treatment approach for patients affected by these disabling disorders remains unclear.1

Functional neurosurgery has gained increasing recognition as a viable treatment option for severe and medication-refractory cases of three times a day. However, deep brain stimulation (DBS) for TDS is a challenging treatment due to the presence of multiple …

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Contributors CZ and BS wrote this paper.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles