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Letter
Haemorrhagic myelitis as a manifestation of MOG antibody-associated disease
  1. Jonathan Ciron1,2,
  2. Damien Biotti1,2,
  3. Chloé Bost2,3,
  4. Fabrice Bonneville4,
  5. Romain Marignier5,6,7
  1. 1 Department of Neurology, CRC-SEP, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse, Midi-Pyrénées, France
  2. 2 Institut Toulousain des Maladies Infectieuses et Inflammatoires (INFINITY), INSERM UMR1291 - CNRS UMR5051, Toulouse University III, Toulouse, France
  3. 3 Immunology Laboratory, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse, Midi-Pyrénées, France
  4. 4 Department of Neuroradiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse, Midi-Pyrénées, France
  5. 5 Centre de Référence des Maladies Inflammatoires Rares du Cerveau et de la Moelle (MIRCEM), Lyon, France
  6. 6 Service de Neurologie, sclérose en plaques, pathologies de la myéline et neuroinflammation, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lyon, Lyon, France
  7. 7 Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jonathan Ciron, Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse, 31059, France; ciron.j{at}chu-toulouse.fr

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We read with interest the recent article ‘MOG antibody-associated encephalitis in adult: clinical phenotypes and outcomes’ by Lee et al 1 and the letter to the editor entitled ‘Acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis as clinical manifestation of MOG antibody-associated disease’ by Skarsta et al.2

In the first article, the authors illustrate three different phenotypes of MOG (myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein) antibody-associated encephalitis in 40 patients, including acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in 17 patients. They highlight the favourable outcome of these encephalitis cases following immunosuppressive treatment.1

Conversely, the second article reports on the case of a patient with acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis (also known as Hurst encephalitis, which is a haemorrhagic variant of ADEM) associated with MOG antibodies, with a highly aggressive clinical course and unfavourable prognosis.2

We would like to raise awareness of another unfavourable presentation of MOG antibody-associated disease (MOGAD), namely haemorrhagic myelitis.

Case presentation

We report on the case of a patient in their 30s who presented in May 2018 with paraparesis that worsened over 2 days, …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors JC contributed to data acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data, drafting the manuscript, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content. DB contributed to analysis and interpretation of data, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content. CB contributed to analysis and interpretation of data, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content. FB contributed to data acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content. RM contributed to analysis and interpretation of data, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.