Responses

PDF
Research paper
Statins and the risk of intracerebral haemorrhage in patients with stroke: systematic review and meta-analysis
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    Snack Shacks, Statin Islands, and Brain Bleeds
    • George K Vilanilam, Clinical Neurology Fellow Mayo Clinic, FL, USA
    • Other Contributors:
      • Aiswarya L Nandakumar, Neurology Research Fellow
      • Mohammed K Badi, Research Trainee

    The interplay among statins, serum cholesterol, and spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) with and without prior history of ischemic stroke is controversial.

    Studies over the last decade, like the GERFHS study,[1] have concluded that increasing serum cholesterol levels may decrease the risk of ICH. This finding was confirmed in one of the largest observational studies[2] which estimated an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 0.94 (0.92-0.96) with every 10 mg increase in baseline serum total cholesterol level. Similar interaction was observed with increasing LDL cholesterol quartiles (LDL > 168 mg/dL; HR 0.53 [0.45-0.63]).[2]

    However, the evidence on the effect of statins in ICH is less clear. Studies ranging from the SPARCL trial[3] which showed an increased risk of recurrent ICH with high dose statins to the recent meta-analysis by Ziff et al.,[4] which described no significant increase of the risk of ICH with statins, are few examples. Similar non-significant trends were seen in the risk of ICH after prior ischemic stroke and prior ICH.[3] Prior retrospective studies also described a neutral effect of statins on recurrent ICH. Interestingly, analysis from the largest administrative database in Israel[2] showed a surprising result; statin use might be associated with decreased ICH risk. Furthermore, an indirect, albeit unique measurement of dose-response using average atorvastatin equivalent daily dose (AAEDD) churned out interesting figures – a HR of 0....

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.