Responses

Download PDFPDF
Original research
Location of intracranial aneurysms is the main factor associated with rupture in the ICAN population
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

  • Published on:
    Large data, but what is the implication comparing the aneurysm discovered by bleeding and those by other reasons?
    • Toshikazu Kimura, Neurosurgeon Department of Neurosurgery, Japanese Red Cross Medical Center

    Dear editor,
    We read with great interest the article by Rousseau et al. “Location of intracranial aneurysms is the main factor associated with rupture in the ICAN population.”1
    They compared ruptured intracranial aneurysms (RIAs) with unruptured cerebral aneurysms (UCAs) in the ICAN registry, and analyzed factors that were considered associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage in previous literature. As a result, they found the location of the aneurysm showed the largest hazard ratio as much as 6.05 and showed their result with beautiful info-graphic.
    We should be careful that their result is derived from comparisons between the aneurysms, which caused subarachnoid hemorrhage and UCAs that was found without bleeding. Hence, the meaning is different from that of ISUIA2, UCAS Japan3, and other studies, which investigated the risk of bleeding from the known UCAs. As noted in the discussion of the headache, which prefers UCAs to RIAs, the factors examined may be seeing factors, which lead to brain examination without causing subarachnoid hemorrhage in France.
    As in the title, they focused on the location of the aneurysm, and found ACA and posterior circulation aneurysms have high odds ratio of 4.99 and 6.05 respectively comparing with ICA aneurysms. As in ISUIA study, they included internal carotid- posterior communicating artery (IC-Pcom) aneurysms in the posterior circulation aneurysms, and “ICA” includes other aneurysms occurring on the ICA. However...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.