eLetters

129 e-Letters

published between 2009 and 2012

  • Striking streaks in linear scleroderma
    Nicol C. Voermans

    Dear Editor,

    With great interest we read the article by Böckle et al (1), who report a patient with muscle atrophy preceding bilateral linear morphea. We would like to confirm the importance of recognizing linear scleroderma as an unusual cause of focal muscle atrophy. Recently we described a similar case (2) and would like to comment on various aspects of Böckle’s report.

    Their case is unusual since t...

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  • Long term monitoring in epilepsy: cutting costs yet reaping the benefits
    Nitin K Sethi

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the article by Yogarajah et al 1. Working in a comprehensive epilepsy center of a tertiary referral hospital in the United States, I found the cost benefit analysis of long term monitoring (LTM) either by video telemetry (VT) or inpatient ambulatory electroencephalography (aEEG) useful information indeed. I agree with the authors that one of the greatest utility of LTM lies in...

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  • Delirium symptoms: visual spatial or attention?
    Jos F de Jonghe

    Dear Editor,

    Brown et al. (2009) examined visual perceptual deficits in delirium. Neuropsychology of Delirium has not been studied extensively. Though the concept of delirium goes back a very long time, it is not referred to in the authorative handbook Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology (Kolb & Whishaw, 2003). Why this apparent lack of neuropsychological interest in delirium? Perhaps because delirium is o...

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  • Azathioprine and Myasthenia Gravis
    Bryan Lecky

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the summary and subsequent commentary on the Cochrane review of immunosuppressant drugs for myasthenia gravis (MG) (Hart et al.2009, Celani et al, 2009). We would like to express concerns regarding the practical implications of these reviews.

    Cochrane reports are not appropriate in guiding clinical practice where highly effective treatments predated the use of randomi...

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  • Effect of hydration status on accuracy of neuroimaging
    Sarah Keir

    Dear Editor,

    Schmidt et al have performed an interesting study using longitudinal brain imaging to monitor progress of dementia and potential response to drugs aiming to modify the disease (1). The authors describe that patients were taking a number of concomitant drugs and in the paper document that the study groups were well-balanced for concomitant use of low-dose neuroleptics, antidepressants and sedatives/...

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  • Exophthalmos is not present in Pourfour du Petit syndrome
    Johannes R. M. Cruysberg

    Dear Editor,

    Mattes and coworkers report an interesting case of Pourfour du Petit syndrome which is very useful because the ‘opposite of Horner syndrome’ is largely unknown [1]. The authors describe that the classical signs of Pourfour du Petit syndrome are mydriasis, lid retraction, exophthalmos, sweating and paleness of the affected side. However, it is probably a misconception that exophthalmos is a clinical s...

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  • Medications for attention deficits in traumatic brain injury: When is the ideal time?
    Manoj Sivan

    Dear Editor,

    I congratulate Catherine Willmott and Jennie Ponsford for their excellent study on use of methylphenidate for attention rehabilitation in an inpatient setting [1]. As they claim, their study is indeed the largest controlled trial on use of methylphenidate for attention deficits in traumatic brain injury.

    It is interesting to see that patients in their study with greater injury severity s...

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  • Longitudinal multimodal imaging in mild to moderate Alzheimer disease: a pilot study with memantine
    Cindy B. Kim

    Dear Editor,

    The two objectives of the study conducted by Schmidt et al.(1) were to test: A) the feasibility of multimodal imaging in Alzheimer’s disease (AD); and B) the effects of memantine in AD. We were unclear as to why the two objectives were not studied separately. Testing the feasibility of multimodal imaging procedures may be clinically valuable. However, we did not understand why it was necessary t...

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  • The effects of memantine treatment on Alzheimer disease for a year are uncertain
    Steven R Brenner

    Dear Editor,

    I read the article by Schmidt (1) with interest with respect to the effects of memantine on multimodal imaging in Alzheimer’s disease.

    The results of the study indicated some possible beneficial effects of memantine treatment after a year, however the volumetric studies did not reach statistical significance which would indicate effects of treatment were uncertain with respect to imaging...

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