eLetters

154 e-Letters

published between 2008 and 2011

  • Perceived memory complaints and memory function in the elderly
    Kao-Chang Lin

    Dear Editor,

    We did a similar study about perceived memory complaints and memory function in polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exposed elderly in Taiwan. PCBs are lipid-soluble and known to affect central nervous functioning. The previous report that developmental delay in children and memory decline in the elderly are merit (1-4). We recruited subjects from Yu- Cheng cohort and selected exposed and unexposed con...

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  • Anaesthetic Considerations
    Catherine T Sheehan

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the review of Neurosurgery and pregnancy by Ng and Kitchen.(1) Although reference is made to teamwork including, among others, a neuroanaesthetist, we wish to raise awareness of some specific obstetric anaesthetic issues that may not be familiar to your readers, including some neuroanaesthetists.

    First, general anaesthesia, recommended by Ng and Kitchen for cerebral aneury...

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  • Do we really need a new antihelminthic drug for neurocysticercosis?
    Amit Prasad

    Dear Editor,

    First of all, we would like to congratulate Carpio et al., (2008) for their paper entitled “The effects of albendazole treatment on neurocysticercosis: a randomized controlled trial”. However, we are not in agreement with the authors urge for a new antihelminthic drug for the treatment of neurocysticercosis (NCC). Therapy for NCC aims at clearance of cysts in the brain and reduced risk of seizure in futu...

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  • Omental transplantation for post-traumatic hypopituitarism
    Hernando Rafael

    Dear Editor

    In a recent review about the prevalence and the natural history of pituitary dysfunction after traumatic brain injury(TBI),Behan et al(1) concluded that TBI is a major public health problem that exerts a high cost for both the individual and society at large,and moreover,marked changes of the hypothalamo-pituitary axis have been documented in the acute phase of TBI such as: 1)gonadotrophin deficiency...

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  • Unapparent seizures as cause of recurrent asystole
    Adam Strzelczyk

    Dear Editor

    The authors present a very interesting case of recurrent asystole in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. However, the pathophysiology of this rare event remains speculative. We agree that a Cushing reflex due to intracranial hypertension is very unlikely to be the culprit as the asystole occurred well before the mass effect developed. An interruption of sympathetic cardiac tone as proposed by the aut...

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  • Model of DBS Lead Employed Affects Clinical Outcome
    Ron L Alterman

    Dear Editor

    We read with great interest the report from Maks et al entitled: “Deep brain stimulation activation volumes and their association with neurophysiological mapping and therapeutic outcomes”. This paper supports previously published articles and the clinical experience of many centers by suggesting that the true therapeutic target for subthalamic DBS may include the white matter dorsal to the subthalamic...

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  • Historical corrections to van Kooten at al.
    Brian E Harrington

    Dear Editor

    van Kooten et al. are to be commended for their outstanding recent contribution to the literature concerning the epidural blood patch.(1) However, I would like to correct some historical comments made in their introduction regarding the original epidural blood patch technique by Dr. James B. Gormley.

    van Kooten et al. incorrectly describe Gormley as “locating the epidural space with the “han...

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  • Hypoceruloplasminemia vs. aceruloplasminemia
    Alberto J Espay

    Dear Editor

    We enjoyed the well-documented case of aceruloplasminemia by Skidmore et al.1 The authors may not have been aware, however, that Miyajima and colleagues (2001)2 drew a distinction between aceruloplasminemia (aCp) and hypoceruloplasminemia (hCp), by describing three Japanese patients with the latter condition, highly resembling the phenotype and imaging reported by Skidmore et al. The Miyajima patients h...

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  • The utility of the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory in neurodegenerative disease
    Andrew J Larner

    Dear Editor

    Like Dr Wedderburn and colleagues,1 we have investigated the clinical utility of the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory (CBI), but in patients attending memory clinics and not preselected for clinical diagnosis. This pragmatic approach has shown that the difference in CBI global score (possible range 0-324) between patients diagnosed with dementia (range 20-239, mean 99.3 +/- 54.0) and without dementia...

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  • Successful treatment of HIV-associated cerebral vasculopathy with HAART
    Nicholas J Cutfield

    Dear Editor

    In response to whether an HIV-associated vasculopathy may be reversible [1], we describe a man with severe cognitive impairment due to an isolated HIV-associated cerebral vasculopathy, likely to be a vasculitis. With initiation of highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART), and without additional antimicrobial or immunosuppressive treatment, he made a major recovery over six weeks to independent...

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