eLetters

190 e-Letters

published between 2006 and 2009

  • This could be low testosterone...
    James M. Howard

    Dear Editor,

    I suggest the findings of Evans, et al., may be explained by low testosterone. Low testosterone has been connected with some symptoms of Parkinson's such as apathy (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2004 Sep;75(9):1323-6). The low level of "sensation seeking traits" may be evidence of low levels of testosterone in Parkinson's as testosterone may be connected with the described behaviors.

    It...

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  • Palilalia in Parkinsonism: localizable to the globus pallidus?
    Alberto J Espay

    Dear Editor,

    In the midst of our search for palilalia (pathological perseveration of words and phrases) in the context of Parkinsonism we encountered the interesting case report by Owens and Okun regarding a mentally retarded man with parkinsonism presumably due to 2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, who had palilalia among other neurological deficits.[1] The main message, namely the consideration of urine organic acids t...

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  • Re: J Morrow et al.
    John A Messenheimer

    Dear Sir:

    In their recent report in this journal of data from the UK Epilepsy and Pregnancy Register, Morrow et al. describe a possible effect of maternal lamotri...

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  • Progression of cerebral white matter lesions in Alzheimer's disease: a new window for therapy?
    Vinod K Gupta

    Dear Editor,

    de Leeuw et al. suggest that treatment of white matter lesions (WML) might ameliorate the rate of progressive cognitive decline in Alzheimer's dissease (AD).[1] If progression of WML is associated with vascular factors, particularly the diastolic blood pressure,[1] it is difficult to conceive how their amelioration might influence the course of neuronal loss in AD.

    AD has no link to states of...

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  • Ultrafast resolution of acute subdural haematoma is probably due to redistribution.
    Manohar Aribandi

    Dear Editor,

    Reviewing the images from the “Neurological Picture” titled “Ultrafast resolution of acute post-traumatic subdural haematoma” that appeared in the December issue of the journal (1), it is difficult to agree with the authors opinion that the cause for the ultra fast resolution of the acute subdural haematoma is a tear in the arachnoid membrane and resulting dilution of haematoma.

    Figure...

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  • Multiple Sclerosis in stepsibships
    Christopher H Hawkes

    Dear Editor,

    This paper addresses environmental versus genetic factors in MS by drawing on the Canadian MS database. From this, 687 stepsibs of MS index cases were identified but only one was found to have the disease - in line with chance expectation. However, only 143/687 had lived together before the age of 15 years – a period which may be critical for the development of MS according to migration studies. Also,...

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  • Inappropriate diagnosis of superior cerebellar artery syndrome
    Trilochan Srivastava

    Dear Editor,

    I read the article “A case of superior cerebellar artery syndrome with contralateral hearing loss at onset” with interest.[1] The authors mentioned the diagnosis of superior cerebellar artery (SCA) was made on the basis of clinical features like deafness, diplopia, vertigo, nystagmus and impaired abducence function. Impaired abducence function has not been mentioned in SCA syndrome.[2] Moreover, sim...

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  • Authors' reply
    Isabelle Crassard

    Dear Editor,

    We totally agree with Dr Prabhu that CT venography is an excellent tool for the diagnosis of CVT and we indeed occasionally use it but, whenever possible, we prefer the combination of MRI/MRV. The obvious advantage of the MRI is the direct visualization of the clot itself with its different signals according to the duration of thrombosis. It can also show, more precisely than CT scan, the associated cer...

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  • Response to “Leech therapy in the treatment of median nerve compression due to forearm haematoma”
    Alexandra M Murray

    Dear Editor,

    Heckmann et al.[1] describe a case of forearm compartment syndrome treated with leeches. A patient receiving anticoagulant drugs following radial arterial catheterisation complained of pain, swelling and hardening of his forearm, with motor and sensory deficit of the hand. There was an increase in forearm girth. This patient was treated by application of 13 leeches to the volar aspect of the forearm. Acco...

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  • Statins and Alzheimer’s disease: Pearls and pitfalls in the theorizing process
    Vinod K Gupta

    Dear Editor,

    Masse et al. believe that statins may offer neuroprotection to patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and recommend placebo-controlled randomized trials.[1] While the accompanying editorial maintains a degree of scientific equipoise,[2] the rolling of the juggernaut of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to settle this issue appears to have been signalled. As is common current practice,[3][4][5][6] the...

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