eLetters

190 e-Letters

published between 2006 and 2009

  • MCI-patients’: worries about their prognosis justified?
    Els Derksen

    Dear Editor,

    In their article Mitchell et al. (2008) presented a review about the long term risk of progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. Across the included cohort studies, the mean annual conversion rate (ACR) to dementia was 4.2%, and a significant relationship was found between the ACR and the duration of the observation period. In studies of less than 5 years' duration the ACR varies f...

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  • Brachial amyotrophic diplegia ,Monomelic amyotrphy: Spectrum of benign anterior horn cell disorders
    Mandaville Gourie-Devi

    Dear Editor,

    I read with great interest the case report of “Brachial amyotrophic diplegia (segmental proximal spinal muscular atrophy) associated with HIV infection reported by Henning and Hewlett 1. The authors describe segmental variant of motor neuron disease with isolated bilateral upper extremity weakness with no evidence of upper motor neuron involvement and progression over few months followed by a stabl...

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  • Neurotoxicity of formaldehyde
    Heikki Savolainen

    Dear Editor,

    Although the association of the formaldehyde exposure with the etiology of ALS may be due to bias, the careful investigation of Weisskopf et al. (1) is thought-provoking.

    Methanol and its first metabolite are neurotoxic (2, 3) because their common end metabolite formic acid is an inhibitor of the cytochrome oxidase in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (3).

    The neurochemical mech...

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  • Risk of incident parkinsonism in essential tremor: missing dystonia?
    Stefania Lalli

    Dear Editor,

    We are glad to see that the Authors appreciate the relevance of the differential diagnostic issue we have highlighted in relation to their cohort. We do agree with them that Parkinson disease, essential tremor and dystonia can be differentiated based on some specific features. Their reply is theoretically correct, although in clinical practice there is a significant degree of overlap. Dystonia is a...

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  • Risk of incident parkinsonism in essential tremor: missing dystonia?
    Julián Benito-León

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Drs. Lalli and Albanese for their comments, although we do not agree with their proposition there was any significant degree of diagnostic misclassification (dystonia cases being misdiagnosed as essential tremor [ET] or Parkinson’s disease [PD]. Dystonic arm tremor may resemble the arm tremor seen in ET because it is a postural and kinetic tremor, and dystonic neck tremor resembles the head...

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  • Postural tachycardia syndrome and anxiety disorders
    Svetlana Blitshteyn

    Dear Editor,

    Raj et al. are to be commended for their study on psychiatric profile in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) (1). Despite small sample size, the study addresses an important aspect in POTS research, which is its relationship to anxiety disorder. The results of the study demonstrate that patients with POTS do not have an increased prevalence of anxiety disorders compared to general populati...

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  • The differences of osmotic effects between intact and disrupted Blood Brain Barrier
    Kao-Chang Lin

    Dear Editor,

    This finding that given of 7.5% Hypertonic Saline (HTS) had better effects to decline the refractory intracranial hypertension (IICP) than Mannitol therapy (1) with which most physicians considered it as the first -line to have osmotic diuresis. The authors stated that HTS had several effects beyond cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygenation in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and t...

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  • Risk of incident parkinsonism in essential tremor: missing dystonia?
    Stefania Lalli

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the article by Benito-Leon and colleagues 1 who claim that patients with ET had a 3–4-fold higher risk of developing incident parkinsonism than participants without baseline ET. This included a 4–5-fold increased risk of PD and a 3–4-fold increased risk of drug- induced parkinsonism. The analysis of 3813 older people (including ET cases and controls) takes origin from a longitudi...

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  • Choice of neuropsychological tests and documentation of modifiable risk factors for stroke
    Oscar Jolobe

    Dear Editor,

    Relevant to the evaluation of post-stroke social functioning(1) is the choice of neuropsychological tests, as well as documentation of risk factors for stroke recurrence, so as to mitigate, through treatment, the risk of worsening cognitive performance attributable to multiple strokes(2). In a recent study where post-stroke cognitive performance was evaluated using a battery of neuropsychological t...

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  • The "eye sign" in acute stroke: not necessarily poor outcome.
    David A Clark

    Dear Editor,

    In the March 2009 edition, Friedman et al presented the case of a 75- year-old man with acute onset of dysarthria, facial droop and right conjugate eye deviation (CED) that could not be overcome by the oculocephalic maneuver (gaze preference) (1). CT, CTA and CTP of the brain confirmed a discrete right middle cerebral artery infarct. The NIH Stroke Scale was 5 and the patient did not receive throm...

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