eLetters

190 e-Letters

published between 2006 and 2009

  • Myopathy and linear morphea
    Barbara C. Böckle

    Dear Editor,

    We would like to comment the letter of Voermans et al. [1]

    Localised scleroderma is characterised clinically by the presence of thickened, sclerotic skin lesions. However, skin changes [2] sometimes present in a discrete manner with only indurated, hyper- and hypopigmented areas. Thus, the clinical diagnosis is delayed. With regard to neuromuscular manifestations of linear scleroderma, a m...

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  • Quality of Life After Stroke
    Rizaldy Pinzon

    Dear Editor,

    This interesting study showed that up to 68% of patients complained of significant work and social dysfunction due to stroke. This study has many implications. The number of people who survive stroke and live with its consequences is increasing. The case fatality rate for stroke has declined over the past few decades,and many of people who experience a stroke now survive.This increase in survival...

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  • Resonse to e-letter by Rogers et al.
    Fergus Doubal

    Dear Editor,

    Rogers et al. make several points. The primary aim of our review was to search in a systematic manner for associations between retinal microvascular abnormalities and stroke subtypes and thus provide clues to the microvascular pathophysiology of lacunar stroke. We aimed to include all relevant studies (not just the large epidemiological ones), carefully evaluate clinical and retinal features for c...

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  • Re: Delirium symptoms: visual spatial or attention?
    Laura J. E. Brown

    Dear Editor,

    De Jonghe raises an extremely important point about the difficulties of interpreting cognitive data from patients with delirium. ‘Inattention’ is one of the core diagnostic criteria for delirium. Accordingly, the attentional deficits with which that these patients present are likely to compromise performance on a wide range of cognitive tasks, irrespective of whether they also have specific deficits...

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  • Striking streaks in linear scleroderma
    Nicol C. Voermans

    Dear Editor,

    With great interest we read the article by Böckle et al (1), who report a patient with muscle atrophy preceding bilateral linear morphea. We would like to confirm the importance of recognizing linear scleroderma as an unusual cause of focal muscle atrophy. Recently we described a similar case (2) and would like to comment on various aspects of Böckle’s report.

    Their case is unusual since t...

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  • Long term monitoring in epilepsy: cutting costs yet reaping the benefits
    Nitin K Sethi

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the article by Yogarajah et al 1. Working in a comprehensive epilepsy center of a tertiary referral hospital in the United States, I found the cost benefit analysis of long term monitoring (LTM) either by video telemetry (VT) or inpatient ambulatory electroencephalography (aEEG) useful information indeed. I agree with the authors that one of the greatest utility of LTM lies in...

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  • Delirium symptoms: visual spatial or attention?
    Jos F de Jonghe

    Dear Editor,

    Brown et al. (2009) examined visual perceptual deficits in delirium. Neuropsychology of Delirium has not been studied extensively. Though the concept of delirium goes back a very long time, it is not referred to in the authorative handbook Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology (Kolb & Whishaw, 2003). Why this apparent lack of neuropsychological interest in delirium? Perhaps because delirium is o...

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  • Azathioprine and Myasthenia Gravis
    Bryan Lecky

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the summary and subsequent commentary on the Cochrane review of immunosuppressant drugs for myasthenia gravis (MG) (Hart et al.2009, Celani et al, 2009). We would like to express concerns regarding the practical implications of these reviews.

    Cochrane reports are not appropriate in guiding clinical practice where highly effective treatments predated the use of randomi...

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  • Effect of hydration status on accuracy of neuroimaging
    Sarah Keir

    Dear Editor,

    Schmidt et al have performed an interesting study using longitudinal brain imaging to monitor progress of dementia and potential response to drugs aiming to modify the disease (1). The authors describe that patients were taking a number of concomitant drugs and in the paper document that the study groups were well-balanced for concomitant use of low-dose neuroleptics, antidepressants and sedatives/...

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  • Exophthalmos is not present in Pourfour du Petit syndrome
    Johannes R. M. Cruysberg

    Dear Editor,

    Mattes and coworkers report an interesting case of Pourfour du Petit syndrome which is very useful because the ‘opposite of Horner syndrome’ is largely unknown [1]. The authors describe that the classical signs of Pourfour du Petit syndrome are mydriasis, lid retraction, exophthalmos, sweating and paleness of the affected side. However, it is probably a misconception that exophthalmos is a clinical s...

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