eLetters

216 e-Letters

published between 2005 and 2008

  • The Corpus Callosum: evolving duties throughout life
    Jonathan T. Kleinman

    Those who do not stop asking silly questions become scientists.

    Dear Editor,

    To date, most studies investigating functional correlates of corpus callosum morphometry have been based on small samples. Jokinen and colleagues link mental slowing on specific tasks to atrophy in distinct subdivisions of the corpus callosum (CC) in a large sample of older adults with white matter lesions(1). The authors hypoth...

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  • More efforts is needed
    Rizaldy Pinzon

    Dear Editor,

    Individual with an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke accounts for about 5 % of all stroke if younger than 45 years of age. The cause of stroke in young differs dramatically compared to the elderly. The most common causes for stroke in young are: cardiac disease, hematological, and dissection.

    The stroke risk factors more complex. Lee, et.al, (2002) found the 4 most common risk factors were hyp...

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  • Hyperhomocysteinemia a possible risk factor for ischemic strokes
    Sanjith Aaron

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the article by Lipska et al1 evaluating the risk factors for young stroke in South India . This study could have also looked at the possible association of an elevated serum Homocysteine level as a risk factor for stroke .There are data supporting even mild to moderate hyperhomocysteinemia as a possible risk factor for ischemic strokes 2, 3

    Elevated levels of Homocys...

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  • Lateralities of motor command and unilateral motor symptoms in complicated migraine.
    iraj derakhshan

    08.12.07

    Dear Editor

    I read the article of Young and colleagues 1 on migraine with unilateral motor symptoms (MUMS) with great interest. As the article contains laterality-indexed aspects (see below) it begs further clinical information from the authors. Thus, “of the 24 patients with MUMS, 21 (88 %) reported unilateral headaches. The weakness was always ipsilateral to the headache in 13 (62 %) patients...

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  • Vitamin D may suppress infections which lead to development of Multiple Sclerosis
    Steven R Brenner

    Dear Editor,

    I read the article with reference to the inverse relationship between multiple sclerosis clinical activity and deficiency of vitamin D by Soilu-Hannienen (1) with interest, and was considering what mechanism could be in play to cause such a relationship.

    25-hydroxylated metabolites of vitamin D act as intracellular regulators of the synthesis and action of defensin (2) molecules against b...

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  • Catecholaminergic grafts and revascularization
    Hernando Rafael

    Dear Editor,

    I wish to comment on the surgical experience by Mínguez- Castellanos and colleagues (1 ) about the carotid body(CB) autotransplantation in each putamen and head of the caudate nucleus in 13 patients with advanced Parkinson´s disease (PD ). CB cell aggregates used for transplantation were placed stereotactically throught a burr hole made in the frontal region, close to the coronal suture. The pie...

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  • EEG in Lewy Body Dementia
    Syed Nizamuddin Ahmed

    Dear Editor,

    The authors present an interesting study using EEG as a tool for the diagnosis of Lewy Body Dementia. They however did not comment on a number of major confounders.

    In their methodology the authors state that the patients were kept "awake as much as possible", but do not comment if they were successful. How many patients with Lewy body dementia attained deeper stages of sleep as compared to...

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  • The "golden rule" will now have to be evaluated in the light of this review
    Oscar M Jolobe

    Dear Editor,

    In the light of the recent review, which highlighted the inability of most tests of cognitive function to specify what "proportion of people who are classified by the screen as impaired who really are impaired"(ie the positive predictive value of the test)(1) it will be difficult, if not impossible, to apply the golden rule from the case of Kenward v Adams(2) to patients who are being evaluated for...

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  • Stenoses in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: the chicken, the egg or an omelette.
    Grant A Bateman

    Dear Sir,

    I read with great interest the letter entitled “Resolution of transverse sinus stenoses immediately after CSF withdrawal in idiopathic intracranial hypertension” recently published in JNNP by Scoffings et al(1). This letter presents the case history of a 35 yrs old patient with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) who had bilateral venous outflow stenosis of the transverse sinuses, which resolved im...

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  • Study results show equivalence with FDG PET atherosclerotic plaque imaging
    James H Rudd

    Dear Editor,

    I greatly enjoyed reading the paper ePublished on June 19th. The finding that plaque inflammation, detected by USPIO MR imaging, is present even within contralateral asymptomatic plaques is similar to that noted in recent FDG PET studies of atherosclerosis. Using plaque FDG uptake as a marker of inflammation, we (Rudd et al Circulation 2002) found that symptomatic lesions had about 30% more inflammat...

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