eLetters

616 e-Letters

  • Straight leg sign may be an important finding
    Robert Badgett

    Dear Editor

    This is a very nicely done study. I agree with the authors that the lack of multivariable significance of the straight leg (SLR) sign is disturbing. The authors propose a physiologic explanation for the lack of association; however, I think the results support the usefulness of the SLR.

    I urge the authors to analyze their results with recursive partitioning with weighted marginals to emphasize...

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  • Treatment arm of your research results/recommendations
    Ureen L Parker

    Dear Editor

    We have a 47 year old female who has spinal myoclonus with segmental myoclonus of the legs involving the L5 and S1 myotomes. She exhibited spinal jerking and leg tremors after herniation of L5-S1 intervertebral disc. Even after decompression and fusion of the segment the spinal and segmental myoclonus remains.

    1. We are looking for treatment approaches for the myoclonus and would appreci...

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  • Prevention is warranted?
    Wladimir Kümmer

    Dear Editor

    The findings published in this article are very interesting. They bring about two questions:

    1 - Does the triptans, being vasoconstrictors, make a migraine related stroke more likely? If so, we are doing a disservice to our patients. We need to know it now.

    2 - Do women with classical migraine need primary stroke prophylaxis? Does the prophylaxis against migraine also work for stroke?

    ...
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  • Lumping or splitting? The case of different pathologies and different tests in brain stem lesions.
    Dirk Ulbricht

    Dear Editor

    I read with pleasure the paper of Garrard et al.[1] outlining the cognitive sequels in patients with a more or less isolated brain stem lesion. Nevertheless, their results might be hampered by several potential pitfalls.

    First, a lesion is not a lesion; it depends on the pathological substrate. So the inclusion of cavernomas might be misleading, as even MRI can’t exclude the presence of a...

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  • Authors' reply
    Peter GE Kennedy

    Dear Editor

    Dr McCorry makes an intriguing point that has indeed occurred to us before. It is theoretically possible that a positive PCR HSV result in the CSF could reflect asymptomatic HSV latency in the sensory ganglia and/or CNS and not viral reactivation causing encephalitis. However, it would be difficult to explain how the virus reaches the CSF from the ganglia or brain in the absence of reactivation. Also, i...

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  • Does a positive HSV PCR neccesarily mean Herpes Simplex encephalitis?
    Dougall J.P McCorry

    Dear Editor

    The assumption is that if PCR for HSV in the CSF is positive this then confirms the diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis, yet it is known that the HSV genome is found in 85-90% of patients at unselected necroscopy in the trigeminal ganglion and so do we know whether HSV DNA can be found in healthy individuals? Could it be that some positive PCR results are truely positive, and not due to con...

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  • Genetic susceptibility to Multiple Sclerosis
    Christopher Hawkes

    Dear Editor

    Reply to Heidi Watson
    What I suggested is that some people are born with gene(s)that confer susceptibility to a sexually transmissible agent, perhaps a retrovirus. If and when they come into contact with the agent then the disease may develop. This principle is well known and applies to other non-sexually tranmitted infections such as TB, leprosy, leishmaniasis and poliomyelitis....

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  • Re: Is multiple sclerosis a sexually transmitted infection?
    Heidi Watson

    Dear Editor

    This correspondence is for the author:
    I am writing in response to your interview on Radio 4 - aired 20/09/02 and after having read the abstract for the above research. My question is simple. You argue that sexual transmission is not the only cause of MS and instead there are inherited factors that make someone who already has a sexually transmitted neurotropic agent more susceptible to...

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  • LB therapy is helpful for sci patients
    A Wernig

    Dear Editor

    In your recent summary you seem to mix up two items when discussing some of our work: The fact (as shown with control groups, Wernig et al. 1995,1998, 1999) that locomotion can significantly be improved by this specific locomotor training (some call it "body weight assisted", some call it "locomotion therapy on the treadmill", we call it "Laufband therapy") and the question where in the CNS the l...

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  • Use it or lose it!
    Krishna Vaitheeswaran

    Dear Editor

    It is of indeed of great interest to learn of the results of the study by Zeloni et al. (Viewing less to see better). The hemiblinding procedure seems to effectively improve utilisation of the neglected field and enhance recovery.

    This, no doubt, would be an important technique for rehabilitation of patients with visuospatial hemineglect.

    In my series of patients (36 patients) w...

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