Table 2

Outcomes in patients (n (%)) with no or small hypoattenuation v large hypoattenuation on initial CT

Outcome eventTime (days)CT findings within 6 h of stroke
Hypoattenuation ⩽33% MCA territoryHypoattenuation >33% MCA territory
Placebort-PAOR (95) CI)Placebort-PAOR (95) CI)
PH114/278 (5)2-150 47/269 (17)2-150 3.99 (2.14–7.44)0/21 (0)2-150 9/31 (29)2-150
Mortality720/279 (7)25/272 (9)1.31 (0.71–2.42)6/21 (29)9/31 (29)1.02 (0.30–3.48)
Mortality90 41/279 (15)51/272 (19)1.34 (0.85–1.34)6/21 (29)15/31 (48)2.34 (0.72–7.63)
Rankin = 0+190 81/277 (29)2-150 108/265 (41)2-150 1.66 (1.17–2.38)3/21 (14)2/31 (6)0.41 (0.06–2.72)
  • 2-150 2p<0.01, Fisher’s exact test between pairs within same hypoattenuation class.

  • PH=parenchymal haematoma. These data from the ECASS show for patients with an ischaemic oedema >33% of the MCA territory (as detected as hypoattenuation on the initial CT scan) an increase in PH, a significantly higher early and late mortality, and a significantly smaller proportion of patients with beneficial outcome in the rt-PA group. The 52 patients with large ischaemic lesions were identified by an independent CT scan evaluation. Small differences in the incidence of outcome events are due to missing values. — = Not calcuable.